Presentation Title

The Potential Effects of Climate Change on Leuresthes tenuis, California Grunion

Presenter Information

Danilo MartinezFollow

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Karen Martin

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

HARBESON 5

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

The Potential Effects of Climate Change on Leuresthes tenuis, California Grunion

Leuresthes tenuis, or the California Grunion is a species of beach spawning fish that wash up on the shore every semilunar tide cycle to lay eggs in the sand. Embryos must then wait until the first semilunar cycle after their initial fertilization and at times even 2 semilunar cycles after being fertilized, this is called extended incubation. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential effects of warmer temperature on the California Grunion in regards to reproduction and survival as an embryo. To do this eggs were collected the morning following a spawning run and separated into three groups. One at 20ºC (optimal temp.), one at 25ºC and another at 30ºC. My hypotheses for this experiment were as follows: 1) Embryos at higher temperatures will use their oil reserves faster and therefore become ready to hatch earlier than normal. 2) Embryos at higher temperatures will use up their oil reserves faster and will not hatch successfully by the time the second semilunar tide cycle arrives. To answer the first hypothesis the data was plotted to obtain a formula for the average rate of change which was compared between groups. This resulted in the rate of change at 30ºC to be 1.6 times higher than at 20ºC, significantly different. To answer the second hypothesis eggs were triggered to hatch daily for 28 days (2 semilunar tide cycles) and the data for each group was analyzed using ANOVA showing 30ºC eggs to be significantly different in terms of hatching success.

Campus: Pepperdine University

Mentor: Dr. Karen Martin

Keywords: Climate change, California Grunion, Beach Spawning, Extended Incubation, Marine Biology, Marine Embryology, Semilunar Tide, Leuresthes tenuis, Plasticity

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

The Potential Effects of Climate Change on Leuresthes tenuis, California Grunion

HARBESON 5

The Potential Effects of Climate Change on Leuresthes tenuis, California Grunion

Leuresthes tenuis, or the California Grunion is a species of beach spawning fish that wash up on the shore every semilunar tide cycle to lay eggs in the sand. Embryos must then wait until the first semilunar cycle after their initial fertilization and at times even 2 semilunar cycles after being fertilized, this is called extended incubation. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential effects of warmer temperature on the California Grunion in regards to reproduction and survival as an embryo. To do this eggs were collected the morning following a spawning run and separated into three groups. One at 20ºC (optimal temp.), one at 25ºC and another at 30ºC. My hypotheses for this experiment were as follows: 1) Embryos at higher temperatures will use their oil reserves faster and therefore become ready to hatch earlier than normal. 2) Embryos at higher temperatures will use up their oil reserves faster and will not hatch successfully by the time the second semilunar tide cycle arrives. To answer the first hypothesis the data was plotted to obtain a formula for the average rate of change which was compared between groups. This resulted in the rate of change at 30ºC to be 1.6 times higher than at 20ºC, significantly different. To answer the second hypothesis eggs were triggered to hatch daily for 28 days (2 semilunar tide cycles) and the data for each group was analyzed using ANOVA showing 30ºC eggs to be significantly different in terms of hatching success.

Campus: Pepperdine University

Mentor: Dr. Karen Martin

Keywords: Climate change, California Grunion, Beach Spawning, Extended Incubation, Marine Biology, Marine Embryology, Semilunar Tide, Leuresthes tenuis, Plasticity