Presentation Title

Longevity and Immune Defense, Evolutionary trade-offs in Drosophila melanogaster

Faculty Mentor

Parvin Shahrestani, Sam Behseta

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 111

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Environmental factors have an effect on the genomics of a population, resulting from evolution through natural selection. Changes in one trait can sometimes trade-off with another trait. Drosophila melanogaster, or the laboratory fruit fly, was used in this study to determine whether selection for improved immune defense trades-off with longevity. Fruit fly's short generation time, ability to produce high numbers of progeny, relatively easy maintenance and fully sequenced genome containing many genes homologous to human diseases make them an ideal species for the investigation of evolutionary trade-offs. We showed that fruit flies experimentally selected for increased fungal resistance had a shorter lifespan after 19 generations of selection. Thereafter, the populations underwent 75 generations of relaxed selection, after which the resistant populations exhibited longer lifespans than their controls. The disappearance of the trade-off between immune defense and longevity suggests other factors impact immune defense and organismal lifespan. Further analysis of the data will be performed to understand this trade-off phenomenon, which could be innovative in the fields of immunology and aging.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Longevity and Immune Defense, Evolutionary trade-offs in Drosophila melanogaster

CREVELING 111

Environmental factors have an effect on the genomics of a population, resulting from evolution through natural selection. Changes in one trait can sometimes trade-off with another trait. Drosophila melanogaster, or the laboratory fruit fly, was used in this study to determine whether selection for improved immune defense trades-off with longevity. Fruit fly's short generation time, ability to produce high numbers of progeny, relatively easy maintenance and fully sequenced genome containing many genes homologous to human diseases make them an ideal species for the investigation of evolutionary trade-offs. We showed that fruit flies experimentally selected for increased fungal resistance had a shorter lifespan after 19 generations of selection. Thereafter, the populations underwent 75 generations of relaxed selection, after which the resistant populations exhibited longer lifespans than their controls. The disappearance of the trade-off between immune defense and longevity suggests other factors impact immune defense and organismal lifespan. Further analysis of the data will be performed to understand this trade-off phenomenon, which could be innovative in the fields of immunology and aging.