Presentation Title

Life-history characteristics of Trachylepis striata, a placental skink.

Faculty Mentor

Marcelo N. Pires

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 112

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Life-history characteristics of Trachylepis striata, a placental skink.

Authors: Noah Husband, Brett Schiller, Israel Ocampo, Anna Groehnert, Sydney Davis

Mentor: Marcelo N. Pires (Department of Biological Sciences, Saddleback College, 28000 Marguerite Pkwy. Mission Viejo, CA 92692; mpires@saddleback.edu)

A recent survey of the reproductive diversity within the southern Africa clade of the skink genus Trachylepis (presented at another poster in this conference) suggested that it contains species that allocate few or no resources to developing offspring during embryonic development (lecithotrophy), but also species that exhibit varying degrees of post-fertilization maternal provisioning (matrotrophy). For this reason, it is a promising group to be a model system for studies of placental evolution. Reproductive characteristics are part of the range of life-history traits that define how organisms allocate resources and have adapted to their environments. Thus, a complete understanding of the evolution of placental reproduction must take into consideration other life-history components. However, very little is known about the life-history characteristics of most species within this clade. Here, we report results from analyses of morphological and life-history variables across populations of Trachylepis striata, a species with extensive placental membranes. We inspected specimens from the collection of the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County and compared the diversity across populations from five different countries. We hypothesize that, as found across species within the genus, there will be significant interpopulation differences among reproductive and other life-history traits within T. striata.

Summary of research results to be presented

While the research is ongoing, we are able to present morphological findings of T. striata across various parts of Africa. The expansive reservoir of specimens from different locations allows greater research of its extensive placental membrane. The hypothesis will be expanded upon with regards to interpopulation differences.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Life-history characteristics of Trachylepis striata, a placental skink.

CREVELING 112

Life-history characteristics of Trachylepis striata, a placental skink.

Authors: Noah Husband, Brett Schiller, Israel Ocampo, Anna Groehnert, Sydney Davis

Mentor: Marcelo N. Pires (Department of Biological Sciences, Saddleback College, 28000 Marguerite Pkwy. Mission Viejo, CA 92692; mpires@saddleback.edu)

A recent survey of the reproductive diversity within the southern Africa clade of the skink genus Trachylepis (presented at another poster in this conference) suggested that it contains species that allocate few or no resources to developing offspring during embryonic development (lecithotrophy), but also species that exhibit varying degrees of post-fertilization maternal provisioning (matrotrophy). For this reason, it is a promising group to be a model system for studies of placental evolution. Reproductive characteristics are part of the range of life-history traits that define how organisms allocate resources and have adapted to their environments. Thus, a complete understanding of the evolution of placental reproduction must take into consideration other life-history components. However, very little is known about the life-history characteristics of most species within this clade. Here, we report results from analyses of morphological and life-history variables across populations of Trachylepis striata, a species with extensive placental membranes. We inspected specimens from the collection of the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County and compared the diversity across populations from five different countries. We hypothesize that, as found across species within the genus, there will be significant interpopulation differences among reproductive and other life-history traits within T. striata.