Presentation Title

Development of Edible Coatings to Extend The Shelf-life of Strawberries (Fragaria ananassa)

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Gabriel Davidov Pardo, Dr. Chunran Han

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 114

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Strawberries are rich in nutrients but highly perishable. About 60 millions tons of food are wasted annually, including half of the harvested strawberries. Biopolymeric edible films have been used in on food products to delay decay. This study focused on developing edible coatings to extend the shelf-life of strawberries using nanoparticles and nanoemulsions. The two coatings were: nanoparticles made of zein and chitosan by antisolvent precipitation (NP) and limonene-MCT-Quillaja nanoemulsions (NE) made by high-pressure homogenization. The size of the NP and NE particles was analyzed by laser diffraction, yielding 151±6 nm and 158±8 nm in diameter, respectively. Strawberries were coated by dipping into NP and NE suspensions and other two controls, distilled water (DI) and acetic acid/ethanol (AE). Due to the incidence of fungal decay, measurements of controls stopped at day 6 of storage at room temperature. The DI and AE strawberries decay reached 47.3 and 21.3%, respectively, while NE and NP showed 5 and 1%, respectively. By day 13, 100% of control strawberries showed decay, while 26% of NE and 10% of NP. The controls at day 6 presented 30-40% more weight loss, an increase of 10 points in the color change rate and an increase in the change of texture of 40% compared to the coated strawberries. By day 13, the NE prevented weight loss better than NP by 9%, due to preventing moisture loss. The change of color hue of the strawberries coated with NE was 13% lower than the NP. The same trend was observed for the texture, as NE showed 7% less softening than the NP. The results indicate that NP and NE edible coatings are a promising option to extend the shelf life of strawberries. In terms of physicochemical properties NE showed better results, while NP was more effective to control fungal decay.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Development of Edible Coatings to Extend The Shelf-life of Strawberries (Fragaria ananassa)

CREVELING 114

Strawberries are rich in nutrients but highly perishable. About 60 millions tons of food are wasted annually, including half of the harvested strawberries. Biopolymeric edible films have been used in on food products to delay decay. This study focused on developing edible coatings to extend the shelf-life of strawberries using nanoparticles and nanoemulsions. The two coatings were: nanoparticles made of zein and chitosan by antisolvent precipitation (NP) and limonene-MCT-Quillaja nanoemulsions (NE) made by high-pressure homogenization. The size of the NP and NE particles was analyzed by laser diffraction, yielding 151±6 nm and 158±8 nm in diameter, respectively. Strawberries were coated by dipping into NP and NE suspensions and other two controls, distilled water (DI) and acetic acid/ethanol (AE). Due to the incidence of fungal decay, measurements of controls stopped at day 6 of storage at room temperature. The DI and AE strawberries decay reached 47.3 and 21.3%, respectively, while NE and NP showed 5 and 1%, respectively. By day 13, 100% of control strawberries showed decay, while 26% of NE and 10% of NP. The controls at day 6 presented 30-40% more weight loss, an increase of 10 points in the color change rate and an increase in the change of texture of 40% compared to the coated strawberries. By day 13, the NE prevented weight loss better than NP by 9%, due to preventing moisture loss. The change of color hue of the strawberries coated with NE was 13% lower than the NP. The same trend was observed for the texture, as NE showed 7% less softening than the NP. The results indicate that NP and NE edible coatings are a promising option to extend the shelf life of strawberries. In terms of physicochemical properties NE showed better results, while NP was more effective to control fungal decay.