Presentation Title

Inputs of Three Different Species to Aquatic and Terrestrial Food Webs

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Cheryl Swift

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 115

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

The Mai Po Nature Reserve in Hong Kong, contains three distinct areas- reed bed, intertidal, and gei wai. We compared food web inputs of Phragmites australis, Aegiceras corniculatum, and Kandelia obovata in all three areas. To quantify aquatic inputs, we separated leaves from different individuals into boxes with different size mesh netting; this allowed for water and insects to get in. We sunk the boxes in the various areas and left them for six weeks. Boxes were collected, the remaining leaf material dried, and the dry weight recorded to calculate a mean percent leaf tissue loss. To quantify terrestrial inputs, we marked ten leaves on five individuals of each species in each area, and returned every three days for six weeks to record the percentage of leaf eaten. At the end of six weeks, leaves were removed, and the leaf and eaten areas were traced and measured to calculate percent area lost. Kandelia obovata had a higher percent loss than P. australis and A. coniculatum for both terrestrial and aquatic food webs. This might be because Phragmites australis and Aegiceras coniculatum have low nutritional value for the various organisms at Mai Po. This is significant because the Mai Po management have recently undertaken the project of converting mangrove forest into reed bed in hopes of helping the bird populations. Converting mangrove forest into reed bed, a key part of the food web for both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, may have detrimental effects on the species that birds exploit.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Inputs of Three Different Species to Aquatic and Terrestrial Food Webs

CREVELING 115

The Mai Po Nature Reserve in Hong Kong, contains three distinct areas- reed bed, intertidal, and gei wai. We compared food web inputs of Phragmites australis, Aegiceras corniculatum, and Kandelia obovata in all three areas. To quantify aquatic inputs, we separated leaves from different individuals into boxes with different size mesh netting; this allowed for water and insects to get in. We sunk the boxes in the various areas and left them for six weeks. Boxes were collected, the remaining leaf material dried, and the dry weight recorded to calculate a mean percent leaf tissue loss. To quantify terrestrial inputs, we marked ten leaves on five individuals of each species in each area, and returned every three days for six weeks to record the percentage of leaf eaten. At the end of six weeks, leaves were removed, and the leaf and eaten areas were traced and measured to calculate percent area lost. Kandelia obovata had a higher percent loss than P. australis and A. coniculatum for both terrestrial and aquatic food webs. This might be because Phragmites australis and Aegiceras coniculatum have low nutritional value for the various organisms at Mai Po. This is significant because the Mai Po management have recently undertaken the project of converting mangrove forest into reed bed in hopes of helping the bird populations. Converting mangrove forest into reed bed, a key part of the food web for both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, may have detrimental effects on the species that birds exploit.