Presentation Title

Feeding behavior of invasive crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, in response to native chemical cues

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Lee Kats

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 15

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Predator-prey dynamics are a central driving force in ecological communities that is altered when non-native species invade, which can result in substantial biodiversity loss of native species. Many ecological factors of a habitat, such as native species prevalence and environmental features, will affect the subsequent success of an invasive species. Invasive crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, were found in other studies to cause trophic cascades due to their omnivorous feeding behavior and are currently invading freshwater streams in the Santa Monica Mountains. Native species are currently declining, and in some instances, are locally extinct due to crayfish. We measured the feeding behavior of P. clarkii on mosquito larvae in the presence of three different native factors: a high nitrate solution (25 ppm) to mimic pollution present in many local streams, a neurotoxin solution (tetrodotoxin) that is secreted by the California newt (Taricha torosa), and an amphibian cue solution created using the California tree frog (Pseudacris cadaverina). The P. cadaverina solution acted as a control for the tetrodotoxin solution since newts produce both the neurotoxin as well as amphibian cues. These chemical cues are the key to communication in natural streams that indicate the presence and population of one species to another. The presence of these different native chemical cues (high nitrates, tetrodotoxin, and amphibian cues) resulted in significantly different P. clarkii feeding behavior of mosquito larvae. These results indicated that preservation of the native amphibians has a significant impact on the feeding behavior of the invasive crayfish.

Summary of research results to be presented

The presence of different native chemical cues such as high nitrates (25 ppm), tetrodotoxin, and amphibian cues, resulted in significantly different P. clarkii feeding behavior of mosquito larvae. It was found that crayfish ate significantly more mosquito larvae in the presence of amphibian cues and significantly less mosquito larva in the presence of tetrodotoxin with a P value of P

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Feeding behavior of invasive crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, in response to native chemical cues

CREVELING 15

Predator-prey dynamics are a central driving force in ecological communities that is altered when non-native species invade, which can result in substantial biodiversity loss of native species. Many ecological factors of a habitat, such as native species prevalence and environmental features, will affect the subsequent success of an invasive species. Invasive crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, were found in other studies to cause trophic cascades due to their omnivorous feeding behavior and are currently invading freshwater streams in the Santa Monica Mountains. Native species are currently declining, and in some instances, are locally extinct due to crayfish. We measured the feeding behavior of P. clarkii on mosquito larvae in the presence of three different native factors: a high nitrate solution (25 ppm) to mimic pollution present in many local streams, a neurotoxin solution (tetrodotoxin) that is secreted by the California newt (Taricha torosa), and an amphibian cue solution created using the California tree frog (Pseudacris cadaverina). The P. cadaverina solution acted as a control for the tetrodotoxin solution since newts produce both the neurotoxin as well as amphibian cues. These chemical cues are the key to communication in natural streams that indicate the presence and population of one species to another. The presence of these different native chemical cues (high nitrates, tetrodotoxin, and amphibian cues) resulted in significantly different P. clarkii feeding behavior of mosquito larvae. These results indicated that preservation of the native amphibians has a significant impact on the feeding behavior of the invasive crayfish.