Presentation Title

Percent Accuracy of Vent Sexing and Wing Sexing Chicks

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Cord Brundage,Ph.D.,DVM

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 2

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

In the poultry industry, baby chicks are separated by sex early on to maximize profits. Cockerels are less valuable due to their inability to produce eggs. As a result, a fraction of cockerels are kept for meat production while most are killed within a few days of being hatched. With commercial and industrial farming, a quick and accurate method for sexing chicks is desired to weed out cockerels and cut costs early on. The majority of commercial farms practice vent sexing, however, this method is time consuming and requires experts to accurately sex chicks without injuring the animals. This study looks to find an accurate method of sexing chicks for less experienced personnel. Thirty-two chicks were hatched (day 0) and sexed using the method of vent sexing at day 0, 7 days, 14 days, 21 days, 28 days, and 35 days. At 35 days, the sex of the chicks was confirmed by observing the secondary sex characteristics of each chick including the size of the comb, males having bigger more prominent combs. The percent accuracy was calculated for each week using the vent sexing method. Another round of chicks will be hatched and sexed using the method of wing sexing. The chicks will be sexed within the first two days of being hatched and the length of their feathers will be compared. The females will be recorded with short covert and long primary feathers and the males with covert feathers and primary feathers of the same length. The sex of the chicks will be confirmed at 35 days by observing the secondary sex characteristics of each chick. Data will be used to compare the percent accuracy of vent sexing and wing sexing chicks.

Summary of research results to be presented

Percent Accuracy for sexing chicks using the method of vent sexing has been calculated. At days 0 (hatching), 7,and 14, the percent accuracy stayed constant at 46.88%. The percent accuracy for males (50.00%) was slightly higher than females (43.75%). At day 21 the percent accuracy increased to 78.13% with the percent accuracy for females ( 93.75%) higher then the males (62.50%). At days 28 and 35 the percent accuracy was 100.00% with day 35 being the confirmation of the chick's actual sex by observing the secondary sex characteristics. Data is still being collected on the chicks that are going to be sexed using the wing sexing method.The percent accuracy will be calculated and compared to the percent accuracy of the vent sexing method.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Percent Accuracy of Vent Sexing and Wing Sexing Chicks

CREVELING 2

In the poultry industry, baby chicks are separated by sex early on to maximize profits. Cockerels are less valuable due to their inability to produce eggs. As a result, a fraction of cockerels are kept for meat production while most are killed within a few days of being hatched. With commercial and industrial farming, a quick and accurate method for sexing chicks is desired to weed out cockerels and cut costs early on. The majority of commercial farms practice vent sexing, however, this method is time consuming and requires experts to accurately sex chicks without injuring the animals. This study looks to find an accurate method of sexing chicks for less experienced personnel. Thirty-two chicks were hatched (day 0) and sexed using the method of vent sexing at day 0, 7 days, 14 days, 21 days, 28 days, and 35 days. At 35 days, the sex of the chicks was confirmed by observing the secondary sex characteristics of each chick including the size of the comb, males having bigger more prominent combs. The percent accuracy was calculated for each week using the vent sexing method. Another round of chicks will be hatched and sexed using the method of wing sexing. The chicks will be sexed within the first two days of being hatched and the length of their feathers will be compared. The females will be recorded with short covert and long primary feathers and the males with covert feathers and primary feathers of the same length. The sex of the chicks will be confirmed at 35 days by observing the secondary sex characteristics of each chick. Data will be used to compare the percent accuracy of vent sexing and wing sexing chicks.