Presentation Title

Acoustic Bat Classification on Santa Rosa Island

Faculty Mentor

Jason Miller, Ph.D

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 21

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

The California Bat (Myotis californicus) has been confirmed as the only species on Santa Rosa Island, which is the second largest island in the Channel Islands National Park. Before our preliminary work, the most recent survey of bats on Santa Rosa Island was done in 1980. Bats are known to be one of the most challenging mammals to study due to their natural history. Without the right equipment and knowledge, it is almost impossible to find bats foraging at night. Surveying bat communities used to rely on mist-netting and in-hand identification similar to the survey conducted in 1980. Today, ultrasonic detectors, such as Anabat, are used to identify bat species by recording their ultrasonic search-phase calls. Anabat Insight, an analysis software, visualizes the data collected and produces measurements, such as minimum and maximum frequency, which is then entered into statistical models. Cluster analysis uses discriminates to sort the data and produces clusters that correspond to the number of possible bat species. As a result, this has lead us to conclude that there could possibly be a second species thriving on Santa Rosa Island.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Acoustic Bat Classification on Santa Rosa Island

CREVELING 21

The California Bat (Myotis californicus) has been confirmed as the only species on Santa Rosa Island, which is the second largest island in the Channel Islands National Park. Before our preliminary work, the most recent survey of bats on Santa Rosa Island was done in 1980. Bats are known to be one of the most challenging mammals to study due to their natural history. Without the right equipment and knowledge, it is almost impossible to find bats foraging at night. Surveying bat communities used to rely on mist-netting and in-hand identification similar to the survey conducted in 1980. Today, ultrasonic detectors, such as Anabat, are used to identify bat species by recording their ultrasonic search-phase calls. Anabat Insight, an analysis software, visualizes the data collected and produces measurements, such as minimum and maximum frequency, which is then entered into statistical models. Cluster analysis uses discriminates to sort the data and produces clusters that correspond to the number of possible bat species. As a result, this has lead us to conclude that there could possibly be a second species thriving on Santa Rosa Island.