Presentation Title

Morphological analysis of a new species of Limia from Haiti

Faculty Mentor

Pablo Weaver

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 22

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

The island of Hispaniola is a hotspot of biodiversity, particularly in the Haitian lake, Miragoane. Due to a lack of conservation resources, much research is still needed to effectively document the biodiversity of freshwater fish in the lake. Naming a species is problematic because of the many challenges inherent in species concepts. Previous research has shown genetic uniqueness of a potentially new species of fish, but it has not been shown to be morphologically distinct. Our experiment focused on evaluating the morphological differences between the putative new species (Limia sp.) and its sister species (Limia nigrofasciata). To analyze the samples, we sedated the fish using a non-lethal dose of MS-222 and photographed twenty different males of each species. Then we identified 15 landmarks and performed geometric morphometric shape analysis using a tpsDig program. The shape analysis will be combined with other data on genetics, behavior, and ecology to define Limia sp. as a distinct species.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Morphological analysis of a new species of Limia from Haiti

CREVELING 22

The island of Hispaniola is a hotspot of biodiversity, particularly in the Haitian lake, Miragoane. Due to a lack of conservation resources, much research is still needed to effectively document the biodiversity of freshwater fish in the lake. Naming a species is problematic because of the many challenges inherent in species concepts. Previous research has shown genetic uniqueness of a potentially new species of fish, but it has not been shown to be morphologically distinct. Our experiment focused on evaluating the morphological differences between the putative new species (Limia sp.) and its sister species (Limia nigrofasciata). To analyze the samples, we sedated the fish using a non-lethal dose of MS-222 and photographed twenty different males of each species. Then we identified 15 landmarks and performed geometric morphometric shape analysis using a tpsDig program. The shape analysis will be combined with other data on genetics, behavior, and ecology to define Limia sp. as a distinct species.