Presentation Title

Size Matters: Comparative Morphology of Rockfish Urogenital Papilla

Faculty Mentor

Kristy L Forsgren

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 24

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Rockfishes are a popular recreational and commercial fishery in California. Rockfish catches account for 20% of the state’s commercial harvest, which contributes $550 million dollars annually to California’s economy. As an economically and ecologically important fishery, regulatory agencies monitor the status of rockfish populations. However, there is no accurate method to identify sex, data that has important implications for fishery management. The objective of our study is to increase our understanding of rockfish reproduction by characterizing the male urogenital papilla of various rockfish species in order to establish a reliable method of externally identifying sex in the field. Rockfishes [starry (Sebastes constellatus), vermilion (Sebastus miniatus), squarespot (Sebastes hopkinsi), blue rockfishes (Sebastes mystinus)] were collected in southern California via hook and line. Gonadal tissues and genital papilla were dissected and preserved, then embedded in paraffin wax. Tissues were sectioned using a rotary microtome, stained, and histologically examined. Additional specimens were borrowed from the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County for external measurements. We have determined that the morphology of the urogenital papilla is species-specific and can be used to accurately identify males. Our future work includes describing the morphology of additional rockfish species to develop a comprehensive tool for fishermen and agency biologists.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Size Matters: Comparative Morphology of Rockfish Urogenital Papilla

CREVELING 24

Rockfishes are a popular recreational and commercial fishery in California. Rockfish catches account for 20% of the state’s commercial harvest, which contributes $550 million dollars annually to California’s economy. As an economically and ecologically important fishery, regulatory agencies monitor the status of rockfish populations. However, there is no accurate method to identify sex, data that has important implications for fishery management. The objective of our study is to increase our understanding of rockfish reproduction by characterizing the male urogenital papilla of various rockfish species in order to establish a reliable method of externally identifying sex in the field. Rockfishes [starry (Sebastes constellatus), vermilion (Sebastus miniatus), squarespot (Sebastes hopkinsi), blue rockfishes (Sebastes mystinus)] were collected in southern California via hook and line. Gonadal tissues and genital papilla were dissected and preserved, then embedded in paraffin wax. Tissues were sectioned using a rotary microtome, stained, and histologically examined. Additional specimens were borrowed from the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County for external measurements. We have determined that the morphology of the urogenital papilla is species-specific and can be used to accurately identify males. Our future work includes describing the morphology of additional rockfish species to develop a comprehensive tool for fishermen and agency biologists.