Presentation Title

The Evolutionary Relationship Between Microbiome Composition and the Host, Drosophila melanogaster

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Parvin Shahrestani

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 101

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

The interaction between the microbiome and host, and the effects the microbiome has on several physiological characteristics of the host such, as longevity, have been the object of intense inquiry in the past few years. However, the effect of host evolution for longevity differentiation on the microbiome composition has not been investigated in the past, which is the main purpose of this study. This research attempts to address whether the microbiome composition of long-lived and short-lived Drosophila melanogaster populations differ significantly. We analyzed metagenome data from ten long-lived populations and ten short-lived populations of D. melanogaster for differences in microbial DNA using Metaphlan. Populations with longer life spans had microbiome compositions dominated with the phylum Proteobacteria whereas the populations with shorter life spans have microbiomes dominated with the phylum Firmicutes. This result was surprising given that previous studies had shown that introducing Proteobacteria to the guts of flies made them short-lived. To confirm our metagenome results, we homogenized flies from five short-lived and five long-lived fly populations and plated the homogenates on MRS medium. The results supported our metagenome findings, with longer-lived populations having more Proteobacteria and shorter-lived populations having more Firmicutes. For future studies, the effects of the microbiome composition on host evolution for lifespan differentiation will be explored.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

The Evolutionary Relationship Between Microbiome Composition and the Host, Drosophila melanogaster

CREVELING 101

The interaction between the microbiome and host, and the effects the microbiome has on several physiological characteristics of the host such, as longevity, have been the object of intense inquiry in the past few years. However, the effect of host evolution for longevity differentiation on the microbiome composition has not been investigated in the past, which is the main purpose of this study. This research attempts to address whether the microbiome composition of long-lived and short-lived Drosophila melanogaster populations differ significantly. We analyzed metagenome data from ten long-lived populations and ten short-lived populations of D. melanogaster for differences in microbial DNA using Metaphlan. Populations with longer life spans had microbiome compositions dominated with the phylum Proteobacteria whereas the populations with shorter life spans have microbiomes dominated with the phylum Firmicutes. This result was surprising given that previous studies had shown that introducing Proteobacteria to the guts of flies made them short-lived. To confirm our metagenome results, we homogenized flies from five short-lived and five long-lived fly populations and plated the homogenates on MRS medium. The results supported our metagenome findings, with longer-lived populations having more Proteobacteria and shorter-lived populations having more Firmicutes. For future studies, the effects of the microbiome composition on host evolution for lifespan differentiation will be explored.