Presentation Title

Adherence of the Sexually Transmitted Parasite Trichomonas vaginalis is Mediated by the Interaction of Surface Proteins with Glycosaminoglycans on the Host Cell Surface

Faculty Mentor

Patricia Johnson

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 28

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Trichomonas vaginalis is an extracellular parasite that causes trichomoniasis, the most prevalent, non-viral, sexually-transmitted infection worldwide. The parasite infects the urogenital tract, colonizing the cervix in women and the prostate and urethra in men. Infection is established and maintained by the parasite’s adherence to the host epithelium. One of the factors mediating parasite adherence are its surface membrane proteins. Comparison of the surface proteomes of strains which vary in adherence phenotypes, revealed increased abundances of several surface membrane proteins. Additional characterization of these proteins suggests an interaction with N-acetyl-glucosamine (NAG). In mammalian cells, NAG is a component of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) on proteoglycans which coat these cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that these T. vaginalis surface proteins directly interact with GAGs on the host surface to mediate adherence. To see if adherence of the parasite to the host cell is mediated by an interaction between surface proteins and GAG molecules, we employed attachment assays using GAG-deficient mammalian cells. We found that the adherence of enriched parasites decreases significantly when cultured on the GAG-deficient line in comparison to the wild-type line, implicating an interaction between these surface proteins and GAGs and potentially mediating adherence. These data will provide insights into the one of the mechanisms that T. vaginalis uses to bind to the host epithelium.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Adherence of the Sexually Transmitted Parasite Trichomonas vaginalis is Mediated by the Interaction of Surface Proteins with Glycosaminoglycans on the Host Cell Surface

CREVELING 28

Trichomonas vaginalis is an extracellular parasite that causes trichomoniasis, the most prevalent, non-viral, sexually-transmitted infection worldwide. The parasite infects the urogenital tract, colonizing the cervix in women and the prostate and urethra in men. Infection is established and maintained by the parasite’s adherence to the host epithelium. One of the factors mediating parasite adherence are its surface membrane proteins. Comparison of the surface proteomes of strains which vary in adherence phenotypes, revealed increased abundances of several surface membrane proteins. Additional characterization of these proteins suggests an interaction with N-acetyl-glucosamine (NAG). In mammalian cells, NAG is a component of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) on proteoglycans which coat these cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that these T. vaginalis surface proteins directly interact with GAGs on the host surface to mediate adherence. To see if adherence of the parasite to the host cell is mediated by an interaction between surface proteins and GAG molecules, we employed attachment assays using GAG-deficient mammalian cells. We found that the adherence of enriched parasites decreases significantly when cultured on the GAG-deficient line in comparison to the wild-type line, implicating an interaction between these surface proteins and GAGs and potentially mediating adherence. These data will provide insights into the one of the mechanisms that T. vaginalis uses to bind to the host epithelium.