Presentation Title

Phylogenetic hypothesis of the diverse North American cicada genus Okanagana: a foundation for studies of geographic, behavioral, and ecological speciation

Faculty Mentor

Jeffrey Cole

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 36

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Geography, sexual selection, and ecology may all contribute to the formation of new species, and quantifying the relative contributions of each of these factors in speciation is of interest to evolutionary biology. Okanagana is the most diverse genus of cicadas in North America, and is well suited to measuring the contributions of each of these factors as the species are variously isolated by geography, differences in male calling songs, and a suite of ecological features including host plant specificity and protoperiodicity. To build a foundation for evolutionary analyses, we estimated a species-level molecular phylogeny of 30 Okanagana taxa together with outgroups from two related genera. Bayesian analysis of concatenated DNA sequence data generated a phylogenetic hypothesis that is consistent with family-level phylogenomic results. Inferences drawn from the phylogeny include the existence of cryptic species isolated by calling song as well as multiple evolutionary origins of extremely fast calling song pulse rates, protoperiodical life cycles, and host plant specificity.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Phylogenetic hypothesis of the diverse North American cicada genus Okanagana: a foundation for studies of geographic, behavioral, and ecological speciation

CREVELING 36

Geography, sexual selection, and ecology may all contribute to the formation of new species, and quantifying the relative contributions of each of these factors in speciation is of interest to evolutionary biology. Okanagana is the most diverse genus of cicadas in North America, and is well suited to measuring the contributions of each of these factors as the species are variously isolated by geography, differences in male calling songs, and a suite of ecological features including host plant specificity and protoperiodicity. To build a foundation for evolutionary analyses, we estimated a species-level molecular phylogeny of 30 Okanagana taxa together with outgroups from two related genera. Bayesian analysis of concatenated DNA sequence data generated a phylogenetic hypothesis that is consistent with family-level phylogenomic results. Inferences drawn from the phylogeny include the existence of cryptic species isolated by calling song as well as multiple evolutionary origins of extremely fast calling song pulse rates, protoperiodical life cycles, and host plant specificity.