Presentation Title

The effect of locality on aggressive behavior in the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Lee B Kats

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 38

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Climate change homogenizes habitat globally, facilitating the expansion and rapid proliferation of invasive species which damage the newly invaded ecosystem. Intraspecific aggression among an invasive species is an important focus in ecological studies because it can contribute to their overall success as invaders. The crayfish species, Procambarus clarkii, inhabits freshwater streams in the Santa Monica Mountains (Los Angeles county) as an aggressive invasive predator. These invasive crayfish are well known for their highly aggressive interactions with conspecifics. It has been shown that body size, temperature, sex, and level of hunger influence their levels of aggression. However, there is a lack of research that investigates how population demography affects agonistic interactions between crayfish. In this study we investigated the effect of site origin on intraspecific aggression of Procambarus clarkii. To test this question, we conducted experimentally controlled trials with pairs of crayfish from the same stream locale and different stream locales and scored their level of aggressive interaction. Crayfish from different stream locales displayed significantly higher intensities of aggressive interactions compared to crayfish pairs from the same locale. Interactions between pairs of crayfish from different locales had an average aggression score that was 50% higher than those from the same locale (P<0.01). This study highlights the impact that site origin has on intraspecific crayfish aggression, which ultimately, may influence their success as an invasive species.

Summary of research results to be presented

When housed individually, crayfish act more aggressively towards adversaries of a different site origin than those of the same site. Regardless of site origin, when crayfish are housed either individually or communally, crayfish act more aggressively towards adversaries of different communities than those of the same community. Crayfish of the same community had an average aggression score of 1.52±0.09. Crayfish of different communities had an average aggression score of 2.34±0.12. A t-test of independent samples was used for statistical analysis, P<0.01.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

The effect of locality on aggressive behavior in the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii

CREVELING 38

Climate change homogenizes habitat globally, facilitating the expansion and rapid proliferation of invasive species which damage the newly invaded ecosystem. Intraspecific aggression among an invasive species is an important focus in ecological studies because it can contribute to their overall success as invaders. The crayfish species, Procambarus clarkii, inhabits freshwater streams in the Santa Monica Mountains (Los Angeles county) as an aggressive invasive predator. These invasive crayfish are well known for their highly aggressive interactions with conspecifics. It has been shown that body size, temperature, sex, and level of hunger influence their levels of aggression. However, there is a lack of research that investigates how population demography affects agonistic interactions between crayfish. In this study we investigated the effect of site origin on intraspecific aggression of Procambarus clarkii. To test this question, we conducted experimentally controlled trials with pairs of crayfish from the same stream locale and different stream locales and scored their level of aggressive interaction. Crayfish from different stream locales displayed significantly higher intensities of aggressive interactions compared to crayfish pairs from the same locale. Interactions between pairs of crayfish from different locales had an average aggression score that was 50% higher than those from the same locale (P<0.01). This study highlights the impact that site origin has on intraspecific crayfish aggression, which ultimately, may influence their success as an invasive species.