Presentation Title

The Black Soldier Fly Project: Utilizing Larvae for Food Waste Recycling

Faculty Mentor

Diane Young Kim

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 4

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Using Black Soldier Fly (BSF, Hermetia illucens) larvae to recycle food waste has the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, while also creating valuable products. In landfills, anaerobic decomposition of organic matter releases methane into the atmosphere, contributing to global warming. Application of BSF larvae to break down organic matter eliminates these emissions, and also produces nutrient-rich liquid fertilizer, nutritious feed (the larvae) for livestock, melanin, and chitin (in the adults), which could themselves be used to create other sustainable products (like batteries). BSF larvae are native to California, highly efficient at breaking down organic matter, and remain relatively inactive during their short life span (~10 days). At USC, we conducted two experiments with different feeds to evaluate conversion ratios, quality of larvae, and growth rates. This work served as a supplement to the information being gathered through the partnership between the Wrigley Institute and RIver Road Research. In our experiments, we grew BSF larvae from nearly microscopic size up until their harvest stage, when they weighed ~0.1g. In each trial, the larvae were raised in small plastic containers at 30°C; treatments included different types and quantities of feed. Results suggested that dried food waste from Catalina is not only a viable feed for BSF larvae, but also produces high quality larvae for animal feed.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

The Black Soldier Fly Project: Utilizing Larvae for Food Waste Recycling

CREVELING 4

Using Black Soldier Fly (BSF, Hermetia illucens) larvae to recycle food waste has the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, while also creating valuable products. In landfills, anaerobic decomposition of organic matter releases methane into the atmosphere, contributing to global warming. Application of BSF larvae to break down organic matter eliminates these emissions, and also produces nutrient-rich liquid fertilizer, nutritious feed (the larvae) for livestock, melanin, and chitin (in the adults), which could themselves be used to create other sustainable products (like batteries). BSF larvae are native to California, highly efficient at breaking down organic matter, and remain relatively inactive during their short life span (~10 days). At USC, we conducted two experiments with different feeds to evaluate conversion ratios, quality of larvae, and growth rates. This work served as a supplement to the information being gathered through the partnership between the Wrigley Institute and RIver Road Research. In our experiments, we grew BSF larvae from nearly microscopic size up until their harvest stage, when they weighed ~0.1g. In each trial, the larvae were raised in small plastic containers at 30°C; treatments included different types and quantities of feed. Results suggested that dried food waste from Catalina is not only a viable feed for BSF larvae, but also produces high quality larvae for animal feed.