Presentation Title

Neural Correlates of Conditioned Taste Aversion

Faculty Mentor

Ayal Lavi

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 40

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Memory encoding underlies the ability of the brain to integrate new information with existing knowledge about the environment in order to learn how to choose the proper reaction to a given situation. Following memory encoding, the brain forms an engram, a representation of the prominent properties of the memory trace, which is stored in the form of cellular and molecular changes in the relevant brain structures. A prominent hallmark of memory encoding and retrieval is the expression of immediate early genes (IEG) that mediate the transformation of transient sensory input into the form of memories in the brain. However, little is known about the direct connection between IEG expression and behavioral output. Therefore, to better understand this connection, we utilized conditioned taste aversion (CTA), a behavioral paradigm that creates an association between a tastant and an aversive emotional experience to understand how CS saliency modulates memory formation and its behavioral output. When comparing a weaker CS with a slightly stronger CS, a weaker taste would make it harder for mice to distinguish between water and saccharine, and thus would hinder learning and effect the neuronal and behavioral output. The acquisition of CTA memory was measured by quantifying and analyzing c-Fos expression in the Insular Cortex (IC) and correlating it to the learning indexes. We found that Sucrose consumption preference is in agreement with the concentration of Sucrose concentration and that neuronal activation is correlated with the associated CTA learning index. Therefore, our findings provide further evidence that there is a direct relationship between memory engram formation and the respective behavioral output.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Neural Correlates of Conditioned Taste Aversion

CREVELING 40

Memory encoding underlies the ability of the brain to integrate new information with existing knowledge about the environment in order to learn how to choose the proper reaction to a given situation. Following memory encoding, the brain forms an engram, a representation of the prominent properties of the memory trace, which is stored in the form of cellular and molecular changes in the relevant brain structures. A prominent hallmark of memory encoding and retrieval is the expression of immediate early genes (IEG) that mediate the transformation of transient sensory input into the form of memories in the brain. However, little is known about the direct connection between IEG expression and behavioral output. Therefore, to better understand this connection, we utilized conditioned taste aversion (CTA), a behavioral paradigm that creates an association between a tastant and an aversive emotional experience to understand how CS saliency modulates memory formation and its behavioral output. When comparing a weaker CS with a slightly stronger CS, a weaker taste would make it harder for mice to distinguish between water and saccharine, and thus would hinder learning and effect the neuronal and behavioral output. The acquisition of CTA memory was measured by quantifying and analyzing c-Fos expression in the Insular Cortex (IC) and correlating it to the learning indexes. We found that Sucrose consumption preference is in agreement with the concentration of Sucrose concentration and that neuronal activation is correlated with the associated CTA learning index. Therefore, our findings provide further evidence that there is a direct relationship between memory engram formation and the respective behavioral output.