Presentation Title

Investigation of neuropeptides of the insulin-like peptide families in mediating repulsive cue-dependent food leaving

Faculty Mentor

Gareth Harris

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 41

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Both vertebrates and invertebrates are capable of responding to a variety of external cues. This allows appropriate behavioral responses to be performed, which are essential for organisms to survive in variable and harsh conditions. Despite understanding the importance of sensory cue perception and decision-making, the cellular mechanisms and neural circuits that mediate these behaviors are not well understood. A number of neuronal pathways have been implicated in sensory-dependent behavioral repertoires across many organisms, including pathways involving serotonin, dopamine and neuropeptides. In our present study, we have investigated the role of insulin-like peptides in sensory-dependent locomotory behavior. Insulin like neuropeptides (ILPs) have been previously implicated in a variety of behaviors, including learning, memory, decision-making and olfactory behaviors. ILPs have also been shown to be expressed in key areas of the mammalian brain required for sensation, neural processing of sensory information and other critical brain regions associated with decision-making behaviors. Interestingly, the roundworm, C. elegans, contains over 40 genes that are predicted to encode ILP-like peptides. We are currently examining different mutants that lack specific functions of ILP-like peptide signaling pathways in a multi-sensory behavioral assay, known as, nonanone-dependent food leaving. We will continue to determine if any of these ILP genes mediate this aversive behavior through genetic manipulation of the worm. We hope that characterization of the role of insulin-like peptides in this multisensory decision-making behavior will provide potential insight into how these pathways may mediate multi-sensory processing in humans. We hope to shed light on how ILPs shape decision-making.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Investigation of neuropeptides of the insulin-like peptide families in mediating repulsive cue-dependent food leaving

CREVELING 41

Both vertebrates and invertebrates are capable of responding to a variety of external cues. This allows appropriate behavioral responses to be performed, which are essential for organisms to survive in variable and harsh conditions. Despite understanding the importance of sensory cue perception and decision-making, the cellular mechanisms and neural circuits that mediate these behaviors are not well understood. A number of neuronal pathways have been implicated in sensory-dependent behavioral repertoires across many organisms, including pathways involving serotonin, dopamine and neuropeptides. In our present study, we have investigated the role of insulin-like peptides in sensory-dependent locomotory behavior. Insulin like neuropeptides (ILPs) have been previously implicated in a variety of behaviors, including learning, memory, decision-making and olfactory behaviors. ILPs have also been shown to be expressed in key areas of the mammalian brain required for sensation, neural processing of sensory information and other critical brain regions associated with decision-making behaviors. Interestingly, the roundworm, C. elegans, contains over 40 genes that are predicted to encode ILP-like peptides. We are currently examining different mutants that lack specific functions of ILP-like peptide signaling pathways in a multi-sensory behavioral assay, known as, nonanone-dependent food leaving. We will continue to determine if any of these ILP genes mediate this aversive behavior through genetic manipulation of the worm. We hope that characterization of the role of insulin-like peptides in this multisensory decision-making behavior will provide potential insight into how these pathways may mediate multi-sensory processing in humans. We hope to shed light on how ILPs shape decision-making.