Presentation Title

Chemical Analysis of Rhamnus crocea Using HPLC and LC-MS

Faculty Mentor

Jacqueline Trischman

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 42

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

In Southern California, an endangered species of insect known as the Hermes copper butterfly (Lycaena hermes) has a tendency to lay its eggs on a specific geographical gradient of spiny redberry (Rhamnus crocea) plants. These plants are commonly found in the greater San Diego area, but are currently compromised by industrial expansion. In an effort to study the butterfly’s affinity for selecting these plants for its reproductive needs we investigated the chemical composition of the plant. This may provide some insight as to the insect’s partiality. Samples of leaves and berries were collected from locations they are known to spawn, as well as from areas where spawning does not occur. The samples were dried, extracted, and analyzed using NMR and MS analyses. Efforts thus far have focused on the use of an Agilent QQQ LC-MS to separate and then identify the masses of compounds in the collected samples. Resulting chromatograms can be used to compare overall chemical compositions and amounts of various plant metabolites in the two regions of interest. Gradient elution was performed using reversed phase HPLC with acetonitrile and water. After deriving a method of separation that produced consistently clear chromatograms, all samples were run through the LC-MS system and analyzed using qualitative analysis software. Retrieved acquisition plots and mass spec results appear to indicate the prevalence of many similar compounds as well as some variation.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Chemical Analysis of Rhamnus crocea Using HPLC and LC-MS

CREVELING 42

In Southern California, an endangered species of insect known as the Hermes copper butterfly (Lycaena hermes) has a tendency to lay its eggs on a specific geographical gradient of spiny redberry (Rhamnus crocea) plants. These plants are commonly found in the greater San Diego area, but are currently compromised by industrial expansion. In an effort to study the butterfly’s affinity for selecting these plants for its reproductive needs we investigated the chemical composition of the plant. This may provide some insight as to the insect’s partiality. Samples of leaves and berries were collected from locations they are known to spawn, as well as from areas where spawning does not occur. The samples were dried, extracted, and analyzed using NMR and MS analyses. Efforts thus far have focused on the use of an Agilent QQQ LC-MS to separate and then identify the masses of compounds in the collected samples. Resulting chromatograms can be used to compare overall chemical compositions and amounts of various plant metabolites in the two regions of interest. Gradient elution was performed using reversed phase HPLC with acetonitrile and water. After deriving a method of separation that produced consistently clear chromatograms, all samples were run through the LC-MS system and analyzed using qualitative analysis software. Retrieved acquisition plots and mass spec results appear to indicate the prevalence of many similar compounds as well as some variation.