Presentation Title

Light Up My Life: An Active Learning Food Lab Designed to Elucidate Conductive Properties of Electrolytes

Faculty Mentor

Jared M. Ashcroft

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 45

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

When compounds dissociate to yield measurable charge in a solvent, the resulting phenomenon is electrolytes. Electrolytes generally dissociate at three levels: non, weak, and strong. In order to visually and quantitatively gauge the dissociation, a conductivity apparatus and a conductivity meter was used to measure the luminosity and the value of conductivity given off by the controls water, Acetic Acid, and Hydrochloric acid. Electrolytes are also prevalent in all if not most foods therefore, different foods were brought to be tested for conductivity and to be categorized under the previous controls. Amongst cucumber, passion fruit, lemon, strawberry, banana, beets, peanut butter, and cream cheese, it was found that all of the various foods exhibited properties of a strong electrolyte which could be accounted for by the high mineral content within most these foods. An example of non a or weak electrolytes would be vinegar, chocolate, and orange in its natural and juice form. Additionally, to showcase the interdisciplinary nature of the sciences, this was also related to biology by testing the various electrolyte properties of biomolecules. Several amino acids and sugars were analyzed using the same technique and it was found that some amino acids exhibited strong electrolyte behavior while the sugars did not. When analyzing the structure, it could be seen that the amino acids depend on its R group to be classified as non, weak, or strong electrolyte.

Keywords: Electrolyte, conductivity, foods, biomolecules, amino acids, sugars,

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Light Up My Life: An Active Learning Food Lab Designed to Elucidate Conductive Properties of Electrolytes

CREVELING 45

When compounds dissociate to yield measurable charge in a solvent, the resulting phenomenon is electrolytes. Electrolytes generally dissociate at three levels: non, weak, and strong. In order to visually and quantitatively gauge the dissociation, a conductivity apparatus and a conductivity meter was used to measure the luminosity and the value of conductivity given off by the controls water, Acetic Acid, and Hydrochloric acid. Electrolytes are also prevalent in all if not most foods therefore, different foods were brought to be tested for conductivity and to be categorized under the previous controls. Amongst cucumber, passion fruit, lemon, strawberry, banana, beets, peanut butter, and cream cheese, it was found that all of the various foods exhibited properties of a strong electrolyte which could be accounted for by the high mineral content within most these foods. An example of non a or weak electrolytes would be vinegar, chocolate, and orange in its natural and juice form. Additionally, to showcase the interdisciplinary nature of the sciences, this was also related to biology by testing the various electrolyte properties of biomolecules. Several amino acids and sugars were analyzed using the same technique and it was found that some amino acids exhibited strong electrolyte behavior while the sugars did not. When analyzing the structure, it could be seen that the amino acids depend on its R group to be classified as non, weak, or strong electrolyte.

Keywords: Electrolyte, conductivity, foods, biomolecules, amino acids, sugars,