Presentation Title

The revitalization of the Los Angeles River is gaining attention as a civic and community resource

Faculty Mentor

Adriane Jones

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 47

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

In 1914, a flood costing the city of Los Angeles millions in damages led to the channelization of the river. The channelization provided flood control and a consistent path for the river. The city of Los Angeles is planning to restore (remove concrete and revegetate) parts of the Los Angeles river as an ecological resource and community enhancement project with increased parks and opportunities for commerce. The 51 miles of L.A. River starts in the Sepulveda Basin, and makes its way through the Glendale Narrows, the City of Industry and empties into the Long Beach Estuary. The river is primarily fed by wastewater from water treatment plants and runoff from the street. In its current state the river has areas with both soft (natural) and concretized banks and bottoms. Little is known about the biology of the Los Angeles river and how channelized portions of the river differ from soft-bottom areas. Over the span of sixteen months from June of 2017-September of 2018, we collected seasonal samples at six sites along the LA River. We measured pH, salinity, temperature, and dissolved oxygen in situ. Samples were also collected for nitrate, ammonia, phosphate, chlorophyll, fecal indicator bacteria, and DNA to characterize the microbial community using 16S rDNA sequencing. The most abundant 16S rDNA sequence was Skeletonema costatum a photosynthetic diatom. Nitrate measurements ranged from 0.3 to 4 mg/L of nitrogen, and ammonia ranged from 0.05 to 0.2 mg/L nitrogen. Phosphate measurements ranged from 34 to 1000 mg/L. In the summer of 2017, E. coli was found at its highest of 3 CFU/ mL at the Sepulveda location and were not detected at Fletcher and Vernon. Other coliforms bacteria were found in high abundance in the summer at both Sepulveda and Marsh at 50 CFU/ mL, while both of those locations in the winter were at 20 CFU/ mL. The EPA set a limit of 126 CFU per 100 mL of E. coli in freshwater, and we found three times more than the limit.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

The revitalization of the Los Angeles River is gaining attention as a civic and community resource

CREVELING 47

In 1914, a flood costing the city of Los Angeles millions in damages led to the channelization of the river. The channelization provided flood control and a consistent path for the river. The city of Los Angeles is planning to restore (remove concrete and revegetate) parts of the Los Angeles river as an ecological resource and community enhancement project with increased parks and opportunities for commerce. The 51 miles of L.A. River starts in the Sepulveda Basin, and makes its way through the Glendale Narrows, the City of Industry and empties into the Long Beach Estuary. The river is primarily fed by wastewater from water treatment plants and runoff from the street. In its current state the river has areas with both soft (natural) and concretized banks and bottoms. Little is known about the biology of the Los Angeles river and how channelized portions of the river differ from soft-bottom areas. Over the span of sixteen months from June of 2017-September of 2018, we collected seasonal samples at six sites along the LA River. We measured pH, salinity, temperature, and dissolved oxygen in situ. Samples were also collected for nitrate, ammonia, phosphate, chlorophyll, fecal indicator bacteria, and DNA to characterize the microbial community using 16S rDNA sequencing. The most abundant 16S rDNA sequence was Skeletonema costatum a photosynthetic diatom. Nitrate measurements ranged from 0.3 to 4 mg/L of nitrogen, and ammonia ranged from 0.05 to 0.2 mg/L nitrogen. Phosphate measurements ranged from 34 to 1000 mg/L. In the summer of 2017, E. coli was found at its highest of 3 CFU/ mL at the Sepulveda location and were not detected at Fletcher and Vernon. Other coliforms bacteria were found in high abundance in the summer at both Sepulveda and Marsh at 50 CFU/ mL, while both of those locations in the winter were at 20 CFU/ mL. The EPA set a limit of 126 CFU per 100 mL of E. coli in freshwater, and we found three times more than the limit.