Presentation Title

Characterization of Dog, Cat, Guinea Pig, and Human IAPP Toxicity in HeLa and AsPC-1 Cells

Faculty Mentor

Luiza Nogaj

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 49

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Type 2 diabetes is one of the leading causes of death in the U.S. Type 2 Diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, where the body suffers from insulin resistance. Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (IAPP) is a regulatory peptide which inhibits glucagon and insulin secretion. The aggregation of IAPP is present in pancreatic islet amyloid deposits seen especially in Type 2 diabetes in humans and other species. Our objective was to see how the changes in IAPP sequence correlate with the toxicity of IAPP. Here, we focus on dog, cat, and guinea pig IAPP. Molecular techniques such as Cell Viability assay and Cytotoxicity assay were used to test the effect those animal IAPP have on HeLa cells and AsPC-1 cells. Cell viability assay results showed that the animal IAPP concentrations had no significant effect on mammalian cell viability while the human IAPP was consistently toxic to the cells. Cell viability percentages stayed relatively constant despite increasing IAPP concentrations. Cytotoxicity assay showed an increase in toxicity with increasing IAPP concentrations of human, cat and guinea pig IAPPs. Dog IAPP cell toxicity stayed constant as IAPP concentration increased. When human and animal IAPPs were mixed, cat IAPP increased cell viability and decreased cell toxicity compared to dog or guinea pig IAPP. Further experiments are necessary to determine a correlation between these specific animal IAPPs and cell toxicity.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Characterization of Dog, Cat, Guinea Pig, and Human IAPP Toxicity in HeLa and AsPC-1 Cells

CREVELING 49

Type 2 diabetes is one of the leading causes of death in the U.S. Type 2 Diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, where the body suffers from insulin resistance. Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (IAPP) is a regulatory peptide which inhibits glucagon and insulin secretion. The aggregation of IAPP is present in pancreatic islet amyloid deposits seen especially in Type 2 diabetes in humans and other species. Our objective was to see how the changes in IAPP sequence correlate with the toxicity of IAPP. Here, we focus on dog, cat, and guinea pig IAPP. Molecular techniques such as Cell Viability assay and Cytotoxicity assay were used to test the effect those animal IAPP have on HeLa cells and AsPC-1 cells. Cell viability assay results showed that the animal IAPP concentrations had no significant effect on mammalian cell viability while the human IAPP was consistently toxic to the cells. Cell viability percentages stayed relatively constant despite increasing IAPP concentrations. Cytotoxicity assay showed an increase in toxicity with increasing IAPP concentrations of human, cat and guinea pig IAPPs. Dog IAPP cell toxicity stayed constant as IAPP concentration increased. When human and animal IAPPs were mixed, cat IAPP increased cell viability and decreased cell toxicity compared to dog or guinea pig IAPP. Further experiments are necessary to determine a correlation between these specific animal IAPPs and cell toxicity.