Presentation Title

Arthropod Abundance in Organic and Inorganic Farms

Faculty Mentor

Mbora, David

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 5

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Recently, there has been a major push for organic farming as a way to promote ecological sustainability, a major part of which is abundance of arthropods. The goal of this research was to determine if there were differences in the abundance of arthropods in organic and inorganic farms. I predicted that when taking pest quantity into account, the arthropod abundance in the organic farm would be lower, resulting in farm types having the same abundance, and possibly having a similar species richness, as excluding the pest would lower richness as well.The question of abundance had an emphasis on servicing guilds, specifically: bees, beetles, and lepidoptera. I sampled 3 plots with 5 pitfalls each, in an organic and inorganic farm, both located in the San Gabriel Valley. After three days I collected the samples, and identified the arthropods within.

I determined that there was not a difference in abundance between farm types (ANOVA, F= 5.04, P= 0.53). I then looked at the difference in abundance between plots within the farm. There was a difference in abundance between the organic plots but not the inorganic (ANOVA, F= 6.6806, P= 0.00). Species richness in the organic and inorganic farms was different (ANOVA, F= 5.2211, P= 0.011 ). There was no difference in species richness between plots in the organic or inorganic farms (ANOVA, F= 4.8731, P< 0.00).

As for beneficial guilds, there was a trend that the watermelon plot in the inorganic farm had a higher abundance of bees than the organic, do to the inorganic watermelon flowering, increasing bee activity. Beetles were found in large amount for both farms, though it was highest in the broccoli and spinach plots. Not enough lepidoptera were collected for interpretation.

Key Words

Diversity

Abundance

Arthropods

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Arthropod Abundance in Organic and Inorganic Farms

CREVELING 5

Recently, there has been a major push for organic farming as a way to promote ecological sustainability, a major part of which is abundance of arthropods. The goal of this research was to determine if there were differences in the abundance of arthropods in organic and inorganic farms. I predicted that when taking pest quantity into account, the arthropod abundance in the organic farm would be lower, resulting in farm types having the same abundance, and possibly having a similar species richness, as excluding the pest would lower richness as well.The question of abundance had an emphasis on servicing guilds, specifically: bees, beetles, and lepidoptera. I sampled 3 plots with 5 pitfalls each, in an organic and inorganic farm, both located in the San Gabriel Valley. After three days I collected the samples, and identified the arthropods within.

I determined that there was not a difference in abundance between farm types (ANOVA, F= 5.04, P= 0.53). I then looked at the difference in abundance between plots within the farm. There was a difference in abundance between the organic plots but not the inorganic (ANOVA, F= 6.6806, P= 0.00). Species richness in the organic and inorganic farms was different (ANOVA, F= 5.2211, P= 0.011 ). There was no difference in species richness between plots in the organic or inorganic farms (ANOVA, F= 4.8731, P< 0.00).

As for beneficial guilds, there was a trend that the watermelon plot in the inorganic farm had a higher abundance of bees than the organic, do to the inorganic watermelon flowering, increasing bee activity. Beetles were found in large amount for both farms, though it was highest in the broccoli and spinach plots. Not enough lepidoptera were collected for interpretation.

Key Words

Diversity

Abundance

Arthropods