Presentation Title

Detecting IAPP Amyloid Fibers from Diabetic and Nondiabetic Organisms

Faculty Mentor

David Moffet

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 50

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Currently, there are 27 million children and adults diagnosed with Type II diabetes in the United States with the number increasing every year. Although the causes of Type II diabetes remain unknown, previous research suggests a direct correlation between the aggregation of Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (IAPP), a 37 amino acid polypeptide, and the death of pancreatic beta cells. As IAPP misfolds, it aggregates and forms amyloidogenic oligomers which are highly toxic to insulin-producing beta cells. Given that not only humans, but also some non-human animals develop type II diabetes, we investigated whether those animals had IAPP variants that could aggregate. We examined the propensity of animal IAPP aggregation using Atomic Force Microscopy and Thioflavin T assays. Our results indicated that animals known to develop type II diabetes showed IAPP aggregation whereas those who do not develop type II diabetes showed no IAPP aggregation.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Detecting IAPP Amyloid Fibers from Diabetic and Nondiabetic Organisms

CREVELING 50

Currently, there are 27 million children and adults diagnosed with Type II diabetes in the United States with the number increasing every year. Although the causes of Type II diabetes remain unknown, previous research suggests a direct correlation between the aggregation of Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (IAPP), a 37 amino acid polypeptide, and the death of pancreatic beta cells. As IAPP misfolds, it aggregates and forms amyloidogenic oligomers which are highly toxic to insulin-producing beta cells. Given that not only humans, but also some non-human animals develop type II diabetes, we investigated whether those animals had IAPP variants that could aggregate. We examined the propensity of animal IAPP aggregation using Atomic Force Microscopy and Thioflavin T assays. Our results indicated that animals known to develop type II diabetes showed IAPP aggregation whereas those who do not develop type II diabetes showed no IAPP aggregation.