Presentation Title

Community Dynamics, Biochemical Composition and Safety of Microalgae grown in Dairy Manure Wastewaters

Faculty Mentor

Greg Barding, Marcia M. Ewers, Shelton E. Murinda, Lesly Palacios, Joe McHugh, Aljona Leka, Urval Patel, Karuel Osada

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 52

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

California leads the nation in milk production, producing more than 30 million tons of manure waste. These organic wastes impact surface water, and air quality. Nutrient recovery from organic wastewaters using microalgae can be coupled with the bioconversion of sunlight into biofuels and feed supplements. Microalgae are highly efficient in their uptake of nitrogen and phosphate. Furthermore, the high protein content in algal cells, as well as high amounts of unsaturated lipids, make microalgae desirable for feed supplement production. Elucidating species-specific carbon allocation, proximate composition, safety and nutritional value of axenic strains will promote the management of outdoor ponds and maximize productivity. DNA from seasonally-isolated axenic strains grown in dairy manure wastewaters was extracted, and the highly conserved 18S rDNA regions selective to Chlorophyceae was amplified. PCR products were sequenced to identify seasonally dominant species through multiple sequence alignment provided by NCBI database. Biochemical composition of axenic strains and algae-microbe biomass grown in primary effluents of manure wastewaters was analyzed using Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy. One-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR techniques were used to quantify and identify soluble metabolites, including essential amino acids and carbohydrate monomers of both soluble and insoluble carbohydrates. Nucleic acids were also quantified using a fluorescent dye, propidium iodide. Lipid levels and composition were assessed following in situ transesterification. Individual fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) were identified and quantified using GC-MS. Pathogen and algal communities present in algal biomass were studied using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS). Samples were tested and quantified for cyanotoxins (microcystin, nodularin, anatoxin-a, saxitoxin, and cylindrospermopsin) using GC-MS and ELISA. Heavy metal concentrations were determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Our findings suggest that algal biomass would be a promising safe feed supplement due to the amino acid composition, protein levels and high amounts of unsaturated lipids in algae.

Summary of research results to be presented

The proton NMR analysis of the amino acids, essential vitamins and proximal biochemical composition of the Algae Cells by specific strain at varying nutrient conditions. Assessing the biomass and waste for potential feed, results showed Cytotoxins such as Shigella was found. Assess the selectivity of the Chloro primer on Chlorophyceae for Specie Identification for ecological studies. Ecological studies for water quality assessment.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Community Dynamics, Biochemical Composition and Safety of Microalgae grown in Dairy Manure Wastewaters

CREVELING 52

California leads the nation in milk production, producing more than 30 million tons of manure waste. These organic wastes impact surface water, and air quality. Nutrient recovery from organic wastewaters using microalgae can be coupled with the bioconversion of sunlight into biofuels and feed supplements. Microalgae are highly efficient in their uptake of nitrogen and phosphate. Furthermore, the high protein content in algal cells, as well as high amounts of unsaturated lipids, make microalgae desirable for feed supplement production. Elucidating species-specific carbon allocation, proximate composition, safety and nutritional value of axenic strains will promote the management of outdoor ponds and maximize productivity. DNA from seasonally-isolated axenic strains grown in dairy manure wastewaters was extracted, and the highly conserved 18S rDNA regions selective to Chlorophyceae was amplified. PCR products were sequenced to identify seasonally dominant species through multiple sequence alignment provided by NCBI database. Biochemical composition of axenic strains and algae-microbe biomass grown in primary effluents of manure wastewaters was analyzed using Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy. One-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR techniques were used to quantify and identify soluble metabolites, including essential amino acids and carbohydrate monomers of both soluble and insoluble carbohydrates. Nucleic acids were also quantified using a fluorescent dye, propidium iodide. Lipid levels and composition were assessed following in situ transesterification. Individual fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) were identified and quantified using GC-MS. Pathogen and algal communities present in algal biomass were studied using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS). Samples were tested and quantified for cyanotoxins (microcystin, nodularin, anatoxin-a, saxitoxin, and cylindrospermopsin) using GC-MS and ELISA. Heavy metal concentrations were determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Our findings suggest that algal biomass would be a promising safe feed supplement due to the amino acid composition, protein levels and high amounts of unsaturated lipids in algae.