Presentation Title

Continued Monitoring of Pollinator Diversity and Abundance in San Timoteo Nature Sanctuary: A Comparison of Native Reseeded and Unmanaged Plots

Faculty Mentor

Dustin VanOverbeke

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 104

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

In 2016 the Redlands Conservancy undertook a management effort in a portion of the San Timoteo Nature Sanctuary (STNS) in Redlands, CA. The STNS is covered in invasive plant species such as tumbleweed, invasive grasses, and mustard. At the site where the management effort was done, the invasive plant species were removed and native plant species (sunflower, monkey flower, brittle bush, and buckwheat) were planted. The experiment began in June 2017 where two sites were selected within the STNS for comparison. One of the sites chosen was where the management effort took place: the reseeded site. The other site that was chosen was still covered in the invasive vegetation: the unmanaged site. In 2018, a continuation of monitoring pollinator abundance and diversity was held at the same two sites. Nine soufflé cups (pan traps), of alternating yellow, white, and blue colors were set up at each site in a square grid pattern. After 24 hours, the total catch in each trap was collected and separated to order, family, and genera. The intended outcome of this management effort would be an increase in pollinator abundance and diversity in the reseeded site. Two years after the management effort, there were significantly more Hymenoptera caught in the unmanaged site than the reseeded site. Therefore, there has been a decrease in effectiveness of the management effort over time. There were also significantly more Halictidae (a family within Hymenoptera) and Parasitoids collected in the unmanaged site, while there was no significant difference in the catch of individuals within the Apidae family between the two sites. The results show that the management effort does not increase diversity, or else there would be significantly more Halictidae, Apidae, and Parasitoids caught in the reseeded site.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Continued Monitoring of Pollinator Diversity and Abundance in San Timoteo Nature Sanctuary: A Comparison of Native Reseeded and Unmanaged Plots

CREVELING 104

In 2016 the Redlands Conservancy undertook a management effort in a portion of the San Timoteo Nature Sanctuary (STNS) in Redlands, CA. The STNS is covered in invasive plant species such as tumbleweed, invasive grasses, and mustard. At the site where the management effort was done, the invasive plant species were removed and native plant species (sunflower, monkey flower, brittle bush, and buckwheat) were planted. The experiment began in June 2017 where two sites were selected within the STNS for comparison. One of the sites chosen was where the management effort took place: the reseeded site. The other site that was chosen was still covered in the invasive vegetation: the unmanaged site. In 2018, a continuation of monitoring pollinator abundance and diversity was held at the same two sites. Nine soufflé cups (pan traps), of alternating yellow, white, and blue colors were set up at each site in a square grid pattern. After 24 hours, the total catch in each trap was collected and separated to order, family, and genera. The intended outcome of this management effort would be an increase in pollinator abundance and diversity in the reseeded site. Two years after the management effort, there were significantly more Hymenoptera caught in the unmanaged site than the reseeded site. Therefore, there has been a decrease in effectiveness of the management effort over time. There were also significantly more Halictidae (a family within Hymenoptera) and Parasitoids collected in the unmanaged site, while there was no significant difference in the catch of individuals within the Apidae family between the two sites. The results show that the management effort does not increase diversity, or else there would be significantly more Halictidae, Apidae, and Parasitoids caught in the reseeded site.