Presentation Title

Investigating a Derivative of Bitter Melon, Tubeimoside I, on Cancer Cells

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Sylvia Vetrone

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 6

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Even though there have been advancements in treatments towards cancer, scientists have not yet found a cure. Current studies suggest some natural supplements can serve as alternative treatments for cancer, with the benefit of reduced to no side effects. Momordica charantia, also known as Bitter melon, is a popular Asian herb used in traditional medicine to treat cholera, anemia, blood diseases, liver and spleen disorders, and diabetes. While, Bitter melon contains various active ingredients (terpenoids, sterols and fatty acids), Tubeimoside I (TBMS1) has been identified as exhibiting antitumor properties in two blood cancers, leukemia and lymphoma, through the induction of cell cycle arrest and death. As these findings support TBMS1 effectiveness against liquid type cancers, we hypothesized that it would also cause cell death against solid tumors. Therefore, this study investigated the effect of TBMS1 on cell viability in breast and prostate cancer. Briefly, MCF7, LNCap, and Jurkat cell lines were exposed to varying concentrations (ranging from 2.5 uM to 40 uM) of TBMS1 over a period of three days and assessed for cell viability, cytotoxicity, and caspase mediated apoptosis. Our results show that both liquid (non-adherent cells) and tumor forming (adherent cells) cancer cell lines experienced a significant decrease in cell viability (p=0.02) when exposed to a minimum of 20 uM TBMS1, but that is was not mediated through apoptosis (p=0.02) when compared to their respective controls. As these results are promising and suggest that TBMS1 can trigger reduced viability in these cancer cell lines, current efforts are exploring if TBMS1 is mediating either necrosis or anoikis cell death.

Summary of research results to be presented

Jurkats had the most increased cell death as they had overall low absorption rates ranging from 0.1% to 6%. The samples with the highest concentration had the lowest absorption rate 0.1% to 1% compared to the lowest concentration with a higher absorption rate of 5% to 6%. This suggests that a higher concentration, from ten to forty uM, of the agent leads to an increased cell death. Further studies need to be conducted to determine the mechanism of death that occurs to the cells because of the TBMS1 agent.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Investigating a Derivative of Bitter Melon, Tubeimoside I, on Cancer Cells

CREVELING 6

Even though there have been advancements in treatments towards cancer, scientists have not yet found a cure. Current studies suggest some natural supplements can serve as alternative treatments for cancer, with the benefit of reduced to no side effects. Momordica charantia, also known as Bitter melon, is a popular Asian herb used in traditional medicine to treat cholera, anemia, blood diseases, liver and spleen disorders, and diabetes. While, Bitter melon contains various active ingredients (terpenoids, sterols and fatty acids), Tubeimoside I (TBMS1) has been identified as exhibiting antitumor properties in two blood cancers, leukemia and lymphoma, through the induction of cell cycle arrest and death. As these findings support TBMS1 effectiveness against liquid type cancers, we hypothesized that it would also cause cell death against solid tumors. Therefore, this study investigated the effect of TBMS1 on cell viability in breast and prostate cancer. Briefly, MCF7, LNCap, and Jurkat cell lines were exposed to varying concentrations (ranging from 2.5 uM to 40 uM) of TBMS1 over a period of three days and assessed for cell viability, cytotoxicity, and caspase mediated apoptosis. Our results show that both liquid (non-adherent cells) and tumor forming (adherent cells) cancer cell lines experienced a significant decrease in cell viability (p=0.02) when exposed to a minimum of 20 uM TBMS1, but that is was not mediated through apoptosis (p=0.02) when compared to their respective controls. As these results are promising and suggest that TBMS1 can trigger reduced viability in these cancer cell lines, current efforts are exploring if TBMS1 is mediating either necrosis or anoikis cell death.