Presentation Title

Does Substrate Density Affect the Metabolism of Cancer Cells

Presenter Information

Freddie AdameFollow

Faculty Mentor

Michelle A Digman

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 61

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

The role of the Extracellular Matrix (ECM) has been shown to interact with cells through integrin-mediated adhesions and focal adhesions located on the cell. Studies have shown that the ECM is a key regulator in cell migration, cell adhesion, and cancer invasion. In this study the goal is to investigate whether changing the density of the ECM regulates the metabolism of melanoma cancer cells, as recent studies have demonstrated that increasing the density of collagen led to an increase in the glycolytic signature of MDA-MB231 cells, a type of triple negative breast cancer cell. The cells were cultured over a scaffold of Collagen-1, as it is the most prevalent ECM protein found in the human body. A previous experiment with melanoma cancer cells under the same conditions of our experiments revealed no significant change in the metabolic index within the melanoma cells when collagen density was increased. In order to ensure that proper adhesion of the A375MM cell line, a type of melanoma cell, to the 1.2 mg/ml and 3.0 mg/ml collagen gel occured, the cells were transfected with α5 integrin.The change in metabolism of the fluorescent, and thus transfected, melanoma cancer cells were recorded using Fluorescent Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM). When the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) complex is in its bound form it has been shown that oxidative phosphorylation is taking place, where as when NADH is in its free form glycolysis is dominant instead. Therefore the NADH populations between the higher free or bound state of NADH can be used to determine cellular metabolism.We hope to successfully increase adherence of the melanoma cancer cells to the ECM, in order to determine if altering the ECM density affects the metabolism of the cancer cells. By studying the microenvironment of cancer cells, we are able to better understand what are the mechanisms and factors that allow the cancer cells to proliferate and eventually metastasize.

Summary of research results to be presented

The melanoma cancer cells tested on increasing collagen densities demonstrated no significant shift in their metabolic index, however when comparing the the transfected cells to the non transfected cell there was a shift toward a glycolytic signature.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Does Substrate Density Affect the Metabolism of Cancer Cells

CREVELING 61

The role of the Extracellular Matrix (ECM) has been shown to interact with cells through integrin-mediated adhesions and focal adhesions located on the cell. Studies have shown that the ECM is a key regulator in cell migration, cell adhesion, and cancer invasion. In this study the goal is to investigate whether changing the density of the ECM regulates the metabolism of melanoma cancer cells, as recent studies have demonstrated that increasing the density of collagen led to an increase in the glycolytic signature of MDA-MB231 cells, a type of triple negative breast cancer cell. The cells were cultured over a scaffold of Collagen-1, as it is the most prevalent ECM protein found in the human body. A previous experiment with melanoma cancer cells under the same conditions of our experiments revealed no significant change in the metabolic index within the melanoma cells when collagen density was increased. In order to ensure that proper adhesion of the A375MM cell line, a type of melanoma cell, to the 1.2 mg/ml and 3.0 mg/ml collagen gel occured, the cells were transfected with α5 integrin.The change in metabolism of the fluorescent, and thus transfected, melanoma cancer cells were recorded using Fluorescent Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM). When the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) complex is in its bound form it has been shown that oxidative phosphorylation is taking place, where as when NADH is in its free form glycolysis is dominant instead. Therefore the NADH populations between the higher free or bound state of NADH can be used to determine cellular metabolism.We hope to successfully increase adherence of the melanoma cancer cells to the ECM, in order to determine if altering the ECM density affects the metabolism of the cancer cells. By studying the microenvironment of cancer cells, we are able to better understand what are the mechanisms and factors that allow the cancer cells to proliferate and eventually metastasize.