Presentation Title

Novel mt genome arrangements in South African Leptophytidae (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Octocorallia)

Faculty Mentor

Catherine McFadden

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 62

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Mitochondrial (mt) genomes are often considered insightful phylogenetic markers. In Octocorallia (Cnidaria: Anthozoa) the arrangements of these genomes can reflect evolutionary relationships. There have been five published arrangements of genes in the mt genomes in octocorals. In all of these arrangements, blocks of protein-coding genes were kept together and blocks were coded on both strands of DNA. Among the different arrangements, blocks were inverted and translocated. Studying nine members of the recently described family of soft corals, Leptophytidae, four novel mt genome arrangements have been identified. Within these arrangements, not only were all of the genes coded on a single strand (similar to Octocorallia’s sister clade Hexacorallia), genes were not in the protein-coding blocks previously identified. It has been proposed that mtMutS, a putative mismatch repair protein, could be the cause of the slow evolution in octocorals and perhaps plays a role in mt genome rearrangement. Future studies will examine how the variation in mtMutS could be altering the rearrangements in Leptophytidae.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Novel mt genome arrangements in South African Leptophytidae (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Octocorallia)

CREVELING 62

Mitochondrial (mt) genomes are often considered insightful phylogenetic markers. In Octocorallia (Cnidaria: Anthozoa) the arrangements of these genomes can reflect evolutionary relationships. There have been five published arrangements of genes in the mt genomes in octocorals. In all of these arrangements, blocks of protein-coding genes were kept together and blocks were coded on both strands of DNA. Among the different arrangements, blocks were inverted and translocated. Studying nine members of the recently described family of soft corals, Leptophytidae, four novel mt genome arrangements have been identified. Within these arrangements, not only were all of the genes coded on a single strand (similar to Octocorallia’s sister clade Hexacorallia), genes were not in the protein-coding blocks previously identified. It has been proposed that mtMutS, a putative mismatch repair protein, could be the cause of the slow evolution in octocorals and perhaps plays a role in mt genome rearrangement. Future studies will examine how the variation in mtMutS could be altering the rearrangements in Leptophytidae.