Presentation Title

Pro-oxidative effect of ascorbic acid on viability and cytotoxicity of myeloma cell line, RPMI 8226

Faculty Mentor

Sylvia Vetrone

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 68

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

In modern society, treatment for cancer has experienced improvement, however, many of these therapies come with harmful side-effects and thus, new studies are needed to find alternatives. Myeloma, a cancer of plasma cells, causes bone reduction and fractures, as well as lowers the immune system making the body susceptible to other opportunistic diseases. Current treatments for myeloma, such as chemotherapy, have persistent side-effects, develop resistance over time, and can cause more problems that tend to have a short-term effect and return after a few years. Ascorbic acid has been shown to have pro-oxidative properties and when applied to various cancer cells, induces apoptosis through increased cellular damage, suggesting that ascorbic acid might serve as a candidate anti-proliferative treatment against myeloma. Therefore, we hypothesized that myeloma cells exposed to ascorbic acid will result in increased death due to high levels of ROS and damaged DNA that trigger apoptosis. For this study, we exposed a myeloma cell line (RPMI 8226) with two different concentrations of 0.25mM and 1.0mM of ascorbic acid for either 48-hour and 72-hours, and then assessed them for viability and cytotoxicity. Our results demonstrate that cells exposed to 1.0mM of ascorbic acid had a statistically reduced viability compared to their non-treated controls in a trypan blue exclusion test. Results from the MTS assay indicated that time had no significant effect on viability between 48-hours and 72-hours, however the cell viability was lower with the higher concentration at both times. These preliminary findings are promising, as they suggest that ascorbic acid might serve as a less-toxic anti-cancer treatment candidate with reduced side-effects. Current studies are focused on exploring the cellular mechanism through which ascorbic acid is inducing its cytotoxicity.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Pro-oxidative effect of ascorbic acid on viability and cytotoxicity of myeloma cell line, RPMI 8226

CREVELING 68

In modern society, treatment for cancer has experienced improvement, however, many of these therapies come with harmful side-effects and thus, new studies are needed to find alternatives. Myeloma, a cancer of plasma cells, causes bone reduction and fractures, as well as lowers the immune system making the body susceptible to other opportunistic diseases. Current treatments for myeloma, such as chemotherapy, have persistent side-effects, develop resistance over time, and can cause more problems that tend to have a short-term effect and return after a few years. Ascorbic acid has been shown to have pro-oxidative properties and when applied to various cancer cells, induces apoptosis through increased cellular damage, suggesting that ascorbic acid might serve as a candidate anti-proliferative treatment against myeloma. Therefore, we hypothesized that myeloma cells exposed to ascorbic acid will result in increased death due to high levels of ROS and damaged DNA that trigger apoptosis. For this study, we exposed a myeloma cell line (RPMI 8226) with two different concentrations of 0.25mM and 1.0mM of ascorbic acid for either 48-hour and 72-hours, and then assessed them for viability and cytotoxicity. Our results demonstrate that cells exposed to 1.0mM of ascorbic acid had a statistically reduced viability compared to their non-treated controls in a trypan blue exclusion test. Results from the MTS assay indicated that time had no significant effect on viability between 48-hours and 72-hours, however the cell viability was lower with the higher concentration at both times. These preliminary findings are promising, as they suggest that ascorbic acid might serve as a less-toxic anti-cancer treatment candidate with reduced side-effects. Current studies are focused on exploring the cellular mechanism through which ascorbic acid is inducing its cytotoxicity.