Presentation Title

Mexican Fan Palm Growth Development: Riparian vs. Chaparral

Faculty Mentor

Erika Catanese Sotela

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 72

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Washingtonia Robusta is a palm tree that is native to northwestern Mexico. These species of palms can also be found in California, Florida, Hawaii, and some parts of Texas or other countries such as Spain or Italy as it enjoys a somewhat tropical environment. It is somewhat of an invasive species as it breeds with well with the Washintonia Filifera and takes nutrients from other plants around when faced with water stress. Palms trees do not necessarily need plenty of water to flourish but this particular species needs more water and nutrients than other species. Looking at two local habitats in Southern California to compare density growth vs. established palms. In Riparian habitats, where water is more abundant, there would be a greater density in Washintonia Robusta whereas in a Chaparral habitat the Washintonia Robusta would be taller due to environmental stress. In Chaparral areas, the Washintonia Robusta is more likely out live most of the neighboring plants when there is a draught. If the palm does become establish, the roots of the tree would not allow anything else to grown within 3ft. of it. Palm leaves absorb more sunlight and are less translucent than typical native riparian trees (Talley 3). Washingtonia Robusta likes to grow in patches around the Arroyo Willow because of the palms height it can block out 30% of the Arroyo Willow’s vital sunlight (Talley 2). By the end of this study, we can better determine whether the Washingtonia Robusta poses a mild threat to riparian envirmorments.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Mexican Fan Palm Growth Development: Riparian vs. Chaparral

CREVELING 72

Washingtonia Robusta is a palm tree that is native to northwestern Mexico. These species of palms can also be found in California, Florida, Hawaii, and some parts of Texas or other countries such as Spain or Italy as it enjoys a somewhat tropical environment. It is somewhat of an invasive species as it breeds with well with the Washintonia Filifera and takes nutrients from other plants around when faced with water stress. Palms trees do not necessarily need plenty of water to flourish but this particular species needs more water and nutrients than other species. Looking at two local habitats in Southern California to compare density growth vs. established palms. In Riparian habitats, where water is more abundant, there would be a greater density in Washintonia Robusta whereas in a Chaparral habitat the Washintonia Robusta would be taller due to environmental stress. In Chaparral areas, the Washintonia Robusta is more likely out live most of the neighboring plants when there is a draught. If the palm does become establish, the roots of the tree would not allow anything else to grown within 3ft. of it. Palm leaves absorb more sunlight and are less translucent than typical native riparian trees (Talley 3). Washingtonia Robusta likes to grow in patches around the Arroyo Willow because of the palms height it can block out 30% of the Arroyo Willow’s vital sunlight (Talley 2). By the end of this study, we can better determine whether the Washingtonia Robusta poses a mild threat to riparian envirmorments.