Presentation Title

Characterizing the Water Column around Catalina Island to Find an Optimal Location for a Prototype Kelp Farm

Faculty Mentor

Adriane Jones, Diane Kim

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 74

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Authors: Glenda Castro, Charlotte Davis, Talynn Glenn, Cynthia Flores

Mentors: Dr. Diane Kim, Dr. Adriane Jones

Marine Biology

Characterizing the Water Column around Catalina Island to Find an Optimal Location for a Prototype Kelp Farm

Our dependence on fossil fuels for energy has two main problems: 1) It is a finite supply and 2) They are the main contributors of carbon dioxide to our environment. Recently, the giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera has looked promising to researchers as a source of renewable biofuels. M. pyrifera is photosynthetic macroalgae that uses the energy from the sun to grow quickly and efficiently. Catalina Island is currently the site of a project testing the feasibility of farming kelp using a “kelp elevator” where the kelp would be raised to the surface during the day to collect sunlight and lowered during the night to absorb nutrients. This project surveyed different locations around Catalina Island in the hopes of finding the best site for a prototype underwater kelp farm. Over the course of two weeks, May 24-June 6,2018, various depths were sampled at three locations: Big Fisherman Cove (BFC) (0m,5m, 10m and 20m); the Wrigley Marine Science Center (WMSC) dock (0m 5m and 10m) and; natural kelp Beds (0m and 5m). The following environmental parameters were measured in the field with YSI and PAR sensors: light, dissolved oxygen, temperature, pH and salinity. Nitrate is the preferred nitrogen source for kelp and was measured in the lab using the spongy cadmium method. Our recommended location is Big Fisherman’s Cove at 5-10 meters deep. It had the highest amount of chlorophyll-a concentration (0.6-0.8 ug/L) which suggests an optimal combination of light(15umol/m2/sec) , temperature(15.5-16.5C), dissolved oxygen(84-86%), pH and salinity (32-32.5 ppt).

Summary of research results to be presented

Based on the data we collected, we suggest that the appropriate depth to have the kelp would be in the range of 5-10 meters. This is because there is a sufficient amount of light penetrating throughout this range. There is an average of 80-90% dissolved oxygen throughout the water column. Although very low, the presence of nitrate remains relatively the same. Big Fisherman’s Cove has the highest amount of chlorophyll-a concentration compared to the other two sites in the 5-10 meter range.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Characterizing the Water Column around Catalina Island to Find an Optimal Location for a Prototype Kelp Farm

CREVELING 74

Authors: Glenda Castro, Charlotte Davis, Talynn Glenn, Cynthia Flores

Mentors: Dr. Diane Kim, Dr. Adriane Jones

Marine Biology

Characterizing the Water Column around Catalina Island to Find an Optimal Location for a Prototype Kelp Farm

Our dependence on fossil fuels for energy has two main problems: 1) It is a finite supply and 2) They are the main contributors of carbon dioxide to our environment. Recently, the giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera has looked promising to researchers as a source of renewable biofuels. M. pyrifera is photosynthetic macroalgae that uses the energy from the sun to grow quickly and efficiently. Catalina Island is currently the site of a project testing the feasibility of farming kelp using a “kelp elevator” where the kelp would be raised to the surface during the day to collect sunlight and lowered during the night to absorb nutrients. This project surveyed different locations around Catalina Island in the hopes of finding the best site for a prototype underwater kelp farm. Over the course of two weeks, May 24-June 6,2018, various depths were sampled at three locations: Big Fisherman Cove (BFC) (0m,5m, 10m and 20m); the Wrigley Marine Science Center (WMSC) dock (0m 5m and 10m) and; natural kelp Beds (0m and 5m). The following environmental parameters were measured in the field with YSI and PAR sensors: light, dissolved oxygen, temperature, pH and salinity. Nitrate is the preferred nitrogen source for kelp and was measured in the lab using the spongy cadmium method. Our recommended location is Big Fisherman’s Cove at 5-10 meters deep. It had the highest amount of chlorophyll-a concentration (0.6-0.8 ug/L) which suggests an optimal combination of light(15umol/m2/sec) , temperature(15.5-16.5C), dissolved oxygen(84-86%), pH and salinity (32-32.5 ppt).