Presentation Title

The Microbiome of Shoreline Ocean Harmful Algae Blooms and their Co-associated Bacteria using Non-Propagative Protocols

Faculty Mentor

Jim Harber

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 76

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Wendy Contreras1, Tiffany Sidwell1,2 , Alicia Romero1,3, Valerie Solinap1,4, Bryan-Ceron Espinosa1, and Dr. James Harber1

1.Oxnard College; 2. Kite Pharmaceuticals; 3. Salk Insitute; 4. Cal Poly Pomona

The Microbiome of Shoreline Ocean Harmful Algae Blooms and their Co-associated Bacteria using Non-Propagative Protocols.

Harmful algae blooms (HABs) produce dangerous toxins in the presence of bacteria populations that support them. Along the Ventura County shores, this ongoing study previously detected levels of a surprising variety of pathogens and toxin producing organisms in separate assays in different years. In this study we tested the hypothesis that harmful algae blooms and equally dangerous bacterial populations are found together seasonally along the Ventura coastline. The methods that were employed included traditional PCR to detect the signals from the eukaryotic HABs and next generation sequencing (NGS) to detect the bacterial populations in the same samples. The results showed an astonishing set of pathogens were present, including a highly antibiotic resistant Vibrio community, Coxiella burnetii (Q fever), Acinetobacter species, Legionella species, Rickettsia species, Salmonella species. Harmful algae detected, such as Pseudo-nitzschia and Lingulodinium polyedra are classified as mixotrophs, which photosynthesize until total microbial populations limit sunlight due to density, at which time they switch metabolism to toxin production to kill competition and feed by phagocytosis. At the present time, it is difficult to monitor harmful algae blooms and their bacterial prey populations in real time. This research produced reliable protocols for ocean monitoring with separate strategies for discovering the composition of the prokaryotic and eukaryotic ocean microbiome in Ventura County. This technology can be incorporated into a genetic programmed environmental sampling processor (ESP) for remote ocean mixotroph detection.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

The Microbiome of Shoreline Ocean Harmful Algae Blooms and their Co-associated Bacteria using Non-Propagative Protocols

CREVELING 76

Wendy Contreras1, Tiffany Sidwell1,2 , Alicia Romero1,3, Valerie Solinap1,4, Bryan-Ceron Espinosa1, and Dr. James Harber1

1.Oxnard College; 2. Kite Pharmaceuticals; 3. Salk Insitute; 4. Cal Poly Pomona

The Microbiome of Shoreline Ocean Harmful Algae Blooms and their Co-associated Bacteria using Non-Propagative Protocols.

Harmful algae blooms (HABs) produce dangerous toxins in the presence of bacteria populations that support them. Along the Ventura County shores, this ongoing study previously detected levels of a surprising variety of pathogens and toxin producing organisms in separate assays in different years. In this study we tested the hypothesis that harmful algae blooms and equally dangerous bacterial populations are found together seasonally along the Ventura coastline. The methods that were employed included traditional PCR to detect the signals from the eukaryotic HABs and next generation sequencing (NGS) to detect the bacterial populations in the same samples. The results showed an astonishing set of pathogens were present, including a highly antibiotic resistant Vibrio community, Coxiella burnetii (Q fever), Acinetobacter species, Legionella species, Rickettsia species, Salmonella species. Harmful algae detected, such as Pseudo-nitzschia and Lingulodinium polyedra are classified as mixotrophs, which photosynthesize until total microbial populations limit sunlight due to density, at which time they switch metabolism to toxin production to kill competition and feed by phagocytosis. At the present time, it is difficult to monitor harmful algae blooms and their bacterial prey populations in real time. This research produced reliable protocols for ocean monitoring with separate strategies for discovering the composition of the prokaryotic and eukaryotic ocean microbiome in Ventura County. This technology can be incorporated into a genetic programmed environmental sampling processor (ESP) for remote ocean mixotroph detection.