Presentation Title

Determination of the Water Quality of a Constructed Wetland Monitoring Fecal Indicator Bacteria

Faculty Mentor

Shelton Murinda

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 77

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Bacterial identification in relation to water quality is significant to public health because it reduces the potential contraction of pathogenic diseases. In 2015, the city of Ontario constructed the Mill Creek Wetlands, a natural treatment wetland facility, in the neighboring city of Chino to address local water quality management, improve water quality for users downstream, and also serve as a recreational area for the community’s habitants. Fecal indicator bacteria (coliforms, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus, and Enterococcus spp.) have been testing higher in the outflow than inflow of the wetlands. To monitor the quality of the water, this study was designed to identify E. coli and Enterococcus spp. in water samples that are collected at various sampling sites of the constructed wetland and analyzed once per month. The data will contribute to the identification of the source of contamination, as well as enable recommendations to the development of a plan for adaptive management. Fecal indicator bacterial counts were conducted on eighteen monthly water samples from nine different locations using the IDEXX system with Quanti-Trays containing Colilert and Enterolert media to test for presence of E. coli and Enterococcus. CHROMagar and Harlequin SMAC-BCIG agar were used for isolation of E. coli, and BBL Enterococcosel agar was used for isolation of Enterococcus spp. Additional testing utilizing PCR with primers specific to E. coli and Enterococcus spp. is being used to further identify if the E. coli isolates are Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC), and if the Enterococcus spp. are E. faecium or E. faecalis. Growth on the species-specific media plates showed positive results for both E. coli and Enterococcus spp. So far, PCR results have been inconclusive for identification of STEC. PCR testing has yet to be completed for more recent samples.

Summary of research results to be presented

We have confirmed E. coli and Enterococcus spp. through PCR analysis. PCR results have been inconclusive for identification of STEC. PCR testing has yet to be completed for more recent samples.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Determination of the Water Quality of a Constructed Wetland Monitoring Fecal Indicator Bacteria

CREVELING 77

Bacterial identification in relation to water quality is significant to public health because it reduces the potential contraction of pathogenic diseases. In 2015, the city of Ontario constructed the Mill Creek Wetlands, a natural treatment wetland facility, in the neighboring city of Chino to address local water quality management, improve water quality for users downstream, and also serve as a recreational area for the community’s habitants. Fecal indicator bacteria (coliforms, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus, and Enterococcus spp.) have been testing higher in the outflow than inflow of the wetlands. To monitor the quality of the water, this study was designed to identify E. coli and Enterococcus spp. in water samples that are collected at various sampling sites of the constructed wetland and analyzed once per month. The data will contribute to the identification of the source of contamination, as well as enable recommendations to the development of a plan for adaptive management. Fecal indicator bacterial counts were conducted on eighteen monthly water samples from nine different locations using the IDEXX system with Quanti-Trays containing Colilert and Enterolert media to test for presence of E. coli and Enterococcus. CHROMagar and Harlequin SMAC-BCIG agar were used for isolation of E. coli, and BBL Enterococcosel agar was used for isolation of Enterococcus spp. Additional testing utilizing PCR with primers specific to E. coli and Enterococcus spp. is being used to further identify if the E. coli isolates are Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC), and if the Enterococcus spp. are E. faecium or E. faecalis. Growth on the species-specific media plates showed positive results for both E. coli and Enterococcus spp. So far, PCR results have been inconclusive for identification of STEC. PCR testing has yet to be completed for more recent samples.