Presentation Title

The physiological effects of flash photography on growing indoor plants

Presenter Information

arin fazioFollow

Faculty Mentor

Arin Fazio

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 78

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

It has been widely documented that artificial light at night is capable of inducing physiological responses in plants (Bennie et al 2016). Much of this scientific research has been focused on outdoor plants and artificial light created by skyglow, urban dwelling, and automobiles. This paper will focus on a much more niche source of artificial light: flash photography. By growing two rows of Ralphanus sativus from the same seed source, in the same studio apartment window and exposing one set to a nightly 30 minutes of continuous camera flash. The plants will be measure in vertical growth, petiole count, and leaf area. Experiment is still in progress but will be completed with statistical analysis by start of conference. The information gained from this study could help photo studios determine if exposing plants to continuous photography flashes would be beneficial for their growth and where their placement within a studio would be most conducive for plant health.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

The physiological effects of flash photography on growing indoor plants

CREVELING 78

It has been widely documented that artificial light at night is capable of inducing physiological responses in plants (Bennie et al 2016). Much of this scientific research has been focused on outdoor plants and artificial light created by skyglow, urban dwelling, and automobiles. This paper will focus on a much more niche source of artificial light: flash photography. By growing two rows of Ralphanus sativus from the same seed source, in the same studio apartment window and exposing one set to a nightly 30 minutes of continuous camera flash. The plants will be measure in vertical growth, petiole count, and leaf area. Experiment is still in progress but will be completed with statistical analysis by start of conference. The information gained from this study could help photo studios determine if exposing plants to continuous photography flashes would be beneficial for their growth and where their placement within a studio would be most conducive for plant health.