Presentation Title

Teaching Plants to Conserve Water: Can Axial Curling with clear tape help plants in times of hot and dry weather?

Faculty Mentor

Professor Catanese

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 79

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Climate change is stressing plants with higher temperatures and droughts. Though plants are incredible at acclimating to their environment, the degree of change in climate patterns is faster than some plants can keep up with. One way few plants are coping is by curling their leaves abaxially to raise the humidity; making the stomata efficient at holding on to water rather than releasing it into the air. Though leaf curling morphology seems to work for plants that develop in hot climates such as the Eriogonum Fasciculatum, it is yet unclear if other plants could benefit from this adaptation and if human intervention is a possibility to save plants from the heat.

This experiment includes Lantana Montevidensis. Using clear tape; leaves will be curled back then stressed for water as will a control group. Humidity data will be collected weekly and compared. Biomass will be compared at the end of the study to verify if this is a way to help plants cope with hot and dry weather.

This research is for a Field Botany class and is not yet concluded. Biomass will be calculated before the presentations are due and the outcome is still unknown as there is not enough information based on humidity levels alone.

Works Cited

Hetherington, A.M., & Woodward, F.I. (2003). The role of stomata in sensing and driving environmental change. Nature, 424, 901-908.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Teaching Plants to Conserve Water: Can Axial Curling with clear tape help plants in times of hot and dry weather?

CREVELING 79

Climate change is stressing plants with higher temperatures and droughts. Though plants are incredible at acclimating to their environment, the degree of change in climate patterns is faster than some plants can keep up with. One way few plants are coping is by curling their leaves abaxially to raise the humidity; making the stomata efficient at holding on to water rather than releasing it into the air. Though leaf curling morphology seems to work for plants that develop in hot climates such as the Eriogonum Fasciculatum, it is yet unclear if other plants could benefit from this adaptation and if human intervention is a possibility to save plants from the heat.

This experiment includes Lantana Montevidensis. Using clear tape; leaves will be curled back then stressed for water as will a control group. Humidity data will be collected weekly and compared. Biomass will be compared at the end of the study to verify if this is a way to help plants cope with hot and dry weather.

This research is for a Field Botany class and is not yet concluded. Biomass will be calculated before the presentations are due and the outcome is still unknown as there is not enough information based on humidity levels alone.

Works Cited

Hetherington, A.M., & Woodward, F.I. (2003). The role of stomata in sensing and driving environmental change. Nature, 424, 901-908.