Presentation Title

Natural History of Microchiroptera

Faculty Mentor

Jason Miller

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:00 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 8:15 AM

Location

C161

Session

Oral 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Microbats, belonging to the suborder microchiroptera are among the most widespread mammal species on the planet, accounting for a fifth of all mammal species. Knowing how this species function in their respective habitat through the studying of past literatures is crucial to developing new research of microbats. Microbats act as both a keystone species supporting the maintenance of their ecosystem and an indicator species, showing researchers observing an ecosystem whether or not a said environment can support life or not, showing researchers factors of an ecosystem that would have been otherwise overlooked. Their form of echolocation that uses ultrasonic frequencies allows them to navigate and forage in the dark for prey, a trait not possessed by any other non-aquatic mammal which can be used in acoustic surveying. Knowing how microbats behave in the wild make it easier to design accurate studies around these animals such as knowing where and how to search for their presence.

Summary of research results to be presented

Increased understanding about how bats interact with their environment and the role they play where they thrive. This includes how bats forage for their pray using echolocation as well as how certain types of bats thrive in different areas. With increased general knowledge of microbat behavioral patterns, more studies can be conducted.

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Nov 17th, 8:00 AM Nov 17th, 8:15 AM

Natural History of Microchiroptera

C161

Microbats, belonging to the suborder microchiroptera are among the most widespread mammal species on the planet, accounting for a fifth of all mammal species. Knowing how this species function in their respective habitat through the studying of past literatures is crucial to developing new research of microbats. Microbats act as both a keystone species supporting the maintenance of their ecosystem and an indicator species, showing researchers observing an ecosystem whether or not a said environment can support life or not, showing researchers factors of an ecosystem that would have been otherwise overlooked. Their form of echolocation that uses ultrasonic frequencies allows them to navigate and forage in the dark for prey, a trait not possessed by any other non-aquatic mammal which can be used in acoustic surveying. Knowing how microbats behave in the wild make it easier to design accurate studies around these animals such as knowing where and how to search for their presence.