Presentation Title

Human Impact on Santa Rosa Island: Documenting the Past to Restore the Present

Faculty Mentor

Sean Kelly

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:15 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

Location

C158

Session

Oral 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Santa Rosa Island is part of the Channel Islands National Park (CINP). Located in the Pacific Ocean, about 25 miles east of Ventura County, California, the island was used for large-scale sheep and cattle ranching. Roosevelt Elk were brought to the island to provide hunters an opportunity to hunt trophy animals. The combined impact of human and non-native mammals on the island decimated the native plant life, drove the native Island Fox to near extinction, and the displacement of Bald Eagles from the island. This project focuses on the politics surrounding the incorporation of Santa Rosa Island into the CINP. Using historic and contemporary photos we present an overview of the human presence on Santa Rosa. Using photos, primary documents, and oral history interviews we 1) capture life on the island during the ranching era, and 2) document the political and policy challenges related to the Park Service’s acquisition of Santa Rosa Island. Using photo data collected by us and others, we conclude with a comparison of the environmental conditions in and around the “Historic Ranch” area during and after the ranching operation. We conclude that efforts aimed at restoring the island must be cognizant of its ranching history. We also argue that that environmental restoration efforts will be limited by the past history of human impact on the island.

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Nov 17th, 8:15 AM Nov 17th, 8:30 AM

Human Impact on Santa Rosa Island: Documenting the Past to Restore the Present

C158

Santa Rosa Island is part of the Channel Islands National Park (CINP). Located in the Pacific Ocean, about 25 miles east of Ventura County, California, the island was used for large-scale sheep and cattle ranching. Roosevelt Elk were brought to the island to provide hunters an opportunity to hunt trophy animals. The combined impact of human and non-native mammals on the island decimated the native plant life, drove the native Island Fox to near extinction, and the displacement of Bald Eagles from the island. This project focuses on the politics surrounding the incorporation of Santa Rosa Island into the CINP. Using historic and contemporary photos we present an overview of the human presence on Santa Rosa. Using photos, primary documents, and oral history interviews we 1) capture life on the island during the ranching era, and 2) document the political and policy challenges related to the Park Service’s acquisition of Santa Rosa Island. Using photo data collected by us and others, we conclude with a comparison of the environmental conditions in and around the “Historic Ranch” area during and after the ranching operation. We conclude that efforts aimed at restoring the island must be cognizant of its ranching history. We also argue that that environmental restoration efforts will be limited by the past history of human impact on the island.