Presentation Title

Distribution of Tongva Middens in Catalina Island

Faculty Mentor

Rhea Presiado

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

CREVELING 90

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Santa Catalina, an island located off the coast of Southern California accessible by ferry from ports throughout Southern California, is known for its natural beauty and diverse marine habitation. The lesser known history of Catalina lies in its archaeological attributes evincing the terrain to have once hosted the Tongva Native American tribe whose diet consisted of, among other things, various shellfish; this history contributes to their reputation for seafaring prowess and oceanographic knowledge (Miller, 1991). Over time, Catalina and other California Channel Islands have been widely studied by scientists researching anything from rising sea levels to ancient piles of seashells left behind by the Tongva (Jew et al. 2013). Santa Catalina provided a rich environment for the native Tongva to hunt and live (Jew et al. 2016). Our research group set out on September 26th, 2018 to discover the impact of these ancient piles of shells, known as middens, by exploring the area surrounding Big Fisherman’s Cove along the Deer Valley Trail and summit adjacent to the Trans-Catalina Highway overlooking the USC Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies. These middens are made up of various masses of fish, bird and mammal bone, and shells preserved in such a way that leaves hundreds of fragments piled up for thousands of years (Arnold, 1997). Our research questions asked, “What is the distribution and characteristics of Tongva middens accessible starting from the Deer Valley Trail trailhead at the USC Wrigley Institute?” Our hypothesis stated, “We will discover at least 2 discernable concentrations of Tongva middens containing varied types of shellfish remains.”

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

Distribution of Tongva Middens in Catalina Island

CREVELING 90

Santa Catalina, an island located off the coast of Southern California accessible by ferry from ports throughout Southern California, is known for its natural beauty and diverse marine habitation. The lesser known history of Catalina lies in its archaeological attributes evincing the terrain to have once hosted the Tongva Native American tribe whose diet consisted of, among other things, various shellfish; this history contributes to their reputation for seafaring prowess and oceanographic knowledge (Miller, 1991). Over time, Catalina and other California Channel Islands have been widely studied by scientists researching anything from rising sea levels to ancient piles of seashells left behind by the Tongva (Jew et al. 2013). Santa Catalina provided a rich environment for the native Tongva to hunt and live (Jew et al. 2016). Our research group set out on September 26th, 2018 to discover the impact of these ancient piles of shells, known as middens, by exploring the area surrounding Big Fisherman’s Cove along the Deer Valley Trail and summit adjacent to the Trans-Catalina Highway overlooking the USC Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies. These middens are made up of various masses of fish, bird and mammal bone, and shells preserved in such a way that leaves hundreds of fragments piled up for thousands of years (Arnold, 1997). Our research questions asked, “What is the distribution and characteristics of Tongva middens accessible starting from the Deer Valley Trail trailhead at the USC Wrigley Institute?” Our hypothesis stated, “We will discover at least 2 discernable concentrations of Tongva middens containing varied types of shellfish remains.”