Presentation Title

Correlative Analysis of Niche Occupation Between Mesozoic and Extant Avifauna

Faculty Mentor

Bell, A. K.

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

CREVELING 110

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Neornithes are the most diverse clade of extant vertebrates, a diversity that arose during the Mesozoic among an abundant pre-Neornithes avifauna that did not survive the end Cretaceous mass extinction event. Modern birds inhabit an extensive array of ecological habitats and have specific and diverse foraging strategies. Understanding the degree to which the observed morphological and ecological diversity of modern birds can be correlated, and how the effects of shared evolutionary history can be excluded, may provide a useful tool for interpreting the ecology of extinct Mesozoic birds. The goal of this study is to first identify phylogenetic signal in modern morphological and ecological data, and then to infer possible ecological niche occupation for extinct Mesozoic birds. A large database of morphometric and ecological data of modern birds was corrected for phylogeny by independent contrasts to evaluate the significance of the correlation between morphology and ecology, followed by comparison of modern and fossil taxa. Results highlight the importance of including phylogenetic considerations in assessments of morphometric data.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

Correlative Analysis of Niche Occupation Between Mesozoic and Extant Avifauna

CREVELING 110

Neornithes are the most diverse clade of extant vertebrates, a diversity that arose during the Mesozoic among an abundant pre-Neornithes avifauna that did not survive the end Cretaceous mass extinction event. Modern birds inhabit an extensive array of ecological habitats and have specific and diverse foraging strategies. Understanding the degree to which the observed morphological and ecological diversity of modern birds can be correlated, and how the effects of shared evolutionary history can be excluded, may provide a useful tool for interpreting the ecology of extinct Mesozoic birds. The goal of this study is to first identify phylogenetic signal in modern morphological and ecological data, and then to infer possible ecological niche occupation for extinct Mesozoic birds. A large database of morphometric and ecological data of modern birds was corrected for phylogeny by independent contrasts to evaluate the significance of the correlation between morphology and ecology, followed by comparison of modern and fossil taxa. Results highlight the importance of including phylogenetic considerations in assessments of morphometric data.