Presentation Title

Investigating the modal vibrational phenomena with a homebuilt Chladni plate

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Serkan Zorba

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

CREVELING 117

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

The objective of this project is twofold: first, design and built a Chladni plate using a speaker, an audio amplifier, and a metal sheet in a machine shop, and second, by driving the Chladni plate with a tone generator, experimentally correlate the vibrational modes of standing waves produced on the plate - and made visible by fine sand - with the driving frequency. We expect to see a dependence of the observable nodes on the boundary conditions, or shapes, of the plates we produced, which can be recorded as a function of frequency. We will compare the configurations of the waves generated in four different plates, with boundary conditions corresponding to various geometrical shapes. We will ascertain the factors that can account for observed differences and similarities across the boundary conditions. We will also try to glean the speed of sound in aluminum information from the observed/measured patterns. Finally, we will compare our findings with extensive experiments performed by the physicist Mary D. Waller in the 1940's on vibrations of free plates.

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

Investigating the modal vibrational phenomena with a homebuilt Chladni plate

CREVELING 117

The objective of this project is twofold: first, design and built a Chladni plate using a speaker, an audio amplifier, and a metal sheet in a machine shop, and second, by driving the Chladni plate with a tone generator, experimentally correlate the vibrational modes of standing waves produced on the plate - and made visible by fine sand - with the driving frequency. We expect to see a dependence of the observable nodes on the boundary conditions, or shapes, of the plates we produced, which can be recorded as a function of frequency. We will compare the configurations of the waves generated in four different plates, with boundary conditions corresponding to various geometrical shapes. We will ascertain the factors that can account for observed differences and similarities across the boundary conditions. We will also try to glean the speed of sound in aluminum information from the observed/measured patterns. Finally, we will compare our findings with extensive experiments performed by the physicist Mary D. Waller in the 1940's on vibrations of free plates.