Presentation Title

Quantitative Analysis of Droplet Interface Bilayer Towards Rational Synthesis of Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Membranes

Faculty Mentor

Stephen Morin

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

CREVELING 14

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Keywords: Membranes, Iron Oxide, Micro-Swimmers, Minerilization, Permeability, Crystal growth

The production of iron oxide microswimmers is a synthetic system used to model certain biological systems of magnetotactic bacteria that undergo mineralization to produce magnetosomes or iron rich particles. Imitating the fine control seen in this biological system, and similar systems that undergo mineralization/crystal nucleation is a notable challenge. We designed a simple system that takes advantage of two lipid saturated droplets of water and or salt solution (0-1.0 µL) to form a droplet inter face bilayer (DIBs): that is, the cross-sectional area of two droplets to transport small molecules or reactants (not including metal ions or salts), stopping coalescence of droplets through an oil-phase stabilizer, composed of hexadecane and the same lipid forming the droplets. We investigated, how various parameters (concentration of salts, lipid concentration, etc.) affect the crystal nucleation/growth; this understanding will enable a finer level of control on crystal growth rate and morphology. We specifically targeted DIB permeability as a quantifiable metric (µm/s) to design DIB crystal growth systems. Fabricated wells composed of 3-D printed rings attached to glass slides via polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were used to capture and image droplet-droplet interactions over time. ImageJ software was used to quantify the bilayer permeability of selected lipid asolectin at ambient temperatures diffusing precursor, through the DIB across its concentration gradient at an average rate of 1700+ or – 800 micrometers/s. We were able to successfully calculate and understand DIB systems that use asolectin, hexadecane, ionic salts, and water. Future applications of this research may include magnetically-controlled drug delivery systems. (NSF-HRD-134563, and NSF-DMR-1420645).

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

Quantitative Analysis of Droplet Interface Bilayer Towards Rational Synthesis of Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Membranes

CREVELING 14

Keywords: Membranes, Iron Oxide, Micro-Swimmers, Minerilization, Permeability, Crystal growth

The production of iron oxide microswimmers is a synthetic system used to model certain biological systems of magnetotactic bacteria that undergo mineralization to produce magnetosomes or iron rich particles. Imitating the fine control seen in this biological system, and similar systems that undergo mineralization/crystal nucleation is a notable challenge. We designed a simple system that takes advantage of two lipid saturated droplets of water and or salt solution (0-1.0 µL) to form a droplet inter face bilayer (DIBs): that is, the cross-sectional area of two droplets to transport small molecules or reactants (not including metal ions or salts), stopping coalescence of droplets through an oil-phase stabilizer, composed of hexadecane and the same lipid forming the droplets. We investigated, how various parameters (concentration of salts, lipid concentration, etc.) affect the crystal nucleation/growth; this understanding will enable a finer level of control on crystal growth rate and morphology. We specifically targeted DIB permeability as a quantifiable metric (µm/s) to design DIB crystal growth systems. Fabricated wells composed of 3-D printed rings attached to glass slides via polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were used to capture and image droplet-droplet interactions over time. ImageJ software was used to quantify the bilayer permeability of selected lipid asolectin at ambient temperatures diffusing precursor, through the DIB across its concentration gradient at an average rate of 1700+ or – 800 micrometers/s. We were able to successfully calculate and understand DIB systems that use asolectin, hexadecane, ionic salts, and water. Future applications of this research may include magnetically-controlled drug delivery systems. (NSF-HRD-134563, and NSF-DMR-1420645).