Presentation Title

Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and Cantilever Effectiveness

Faculty Mentor

Tim Usher

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

CREVELING 18

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and Cantilever Effectiveness

Author: Jonas Etzweiler, California State University San Bernardino

Mentor: Timothy Usher, Professor of Physical Science, California State University San Bernardino

Grant number: 1345163

Atomic force microscopes (AFM) can be used to read or alter (“write”) the polar domains of ferroelectric samples. Multiple cantilevers or tips are available for use. The results reflected that the most effective AFM cantilever for reading and writing ferroelectric domains was the NSG10/TiN cantilever. The NSG10/TiN is a stiff Titanium Nitrate coated cantilever with a resonant frequency between 140 and 240kHz. Other cantilevers that were tested were: CSG10/Pt (8-39kHz), and HA_NC_A/Pt (235kHz). The ferroelectric sample was barium titanate (BTO) with a thickness of 256.54μm. Contact mode was used for both reading and writing and a voltage range of ±10V DC to ±149.5V DC were applied to the sample in order to “write” domains. An AC signal of amplitude ±10V and a frequency range 140kHz to 390kHz were used to read domains. A commercial AFM, the NT-MDT NEXT was used in this research to verify the hypothesis that a stiffer cantilever reduces the effects of image disruption and that the TiN coating is less likely to cause residual surface charge during scanning.

Key Words: Atomic force microscope (AFM), Cantilever, Ferroelectric, Piezoelectric, Polar Domains, Surface Charge, Piezo Force Microscopy (PFM)

Summary of research results to be presented

Cantilever difference has a large impact on scan results, as the known sample scans continued the difference become more evident. The stiffness of the cantilever or tip is the basis for the quality of the reading scans. Barium titanate in this research, Using a cantilever with high stiffness and a coating of titanium nitrate had the best Imaging results.

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and Cantilever Effectiveness

CREVELING 18

Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and Cantilever Effectiveness

Author: Jonas Etzweiler, California State University San Bernardino

Mentor: Timothy Usher, Professor of Physical Science, California State University San Bernardino

Grant number: 1345163

Atomic force microscopes (AFM) can be used to read or alter (“write”) the polar domains of ferroelectric samples. Multiple cantilevers or tips are available for use. The results reflected that the most effective AFM cantilever for reading and writing ferroelectric domains was the NSG10/TiN cantilever. The NSG10/TiN is a stiff Titanium Nitrate coated cantilever with a resonant frequency between 140 and 240kHz. Other cantilevers that were tested were: CSG10/Pt (8-39kHz), and HA_NC_A/Pt (235kHz). The ferroelectric sample was barium titanate (BTO) with a thickness of 256.54μm. Contact mode was used for both reading and writing and a voltage range of ±10V DC to ±149.5V DC were applied to the sample in order to “write” domains. An AC signal of amplitude ±10V and a frequency range 140kHz to 390kHz were used to read domains. A commercial AFM, the NT-MDT NEXT was used in this research to verify the hypothesis that a stiffer cantilever reduces the effects of image disruption and that the TiN coating is less likely to cause residual surface charge during scanning.

Key Words: Atomic force microscope (AFM), Cantilever, Ferroelectric, Piezoelectric, Polar Domains, Surface Charge, Piezo Force Microscopy (PFM)