Presentation Title

Mechanisms of Adhesion of a Bacterial Predator to Surfaces with Quantitative Force Measurements

Faculty Mentor

Eileen M. Spain

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

CREVELING 24

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

The Gram-negative bacterial predator Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus has the capability to consume other Gram-negative prey bacteria including pathogens in biofilms. As a result, utilizing Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus as an approach for drug-free biofilm control is a robust area of current research. Our research is aimed at elucidating the physiochemical mechanisms of Bdellovibrio adhesion to prey cells, including E. coli, as part of its overall lifecycle to hunt and consume prey. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) with force measurement modes is the technique utilized to quantitatively measure the force and timescales of adhesion between Bdellovibrio and E. coli as well as a series of chemically distinct surfaces. Our study echoes previously published work [Xu, H. et al. Langmuir, 2013, 29 (9), pp 3000–3011], where AFM force measurement data are collected for live bacterial cells interacting with specifically characterized chemical surfaces under buffer solution. Interpretation of these force data will be presented, leading to a better understanding of the prey sensing mechanisms of this enigmatic bacterial predator.

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

Mechanisms of Adhesion of a Bacterial Predator to Surfaces with Quantitative Force Measurements

CREVELING 24

The Gram-negative bacterial predator Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus has the capability to consume other Gram-negative prey bacteria including pathogens in biofilms. As a result, utilizing Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus as an approach for drug-free biofilm control is a robust area of current research. Our research is aimed at elucidating the physiochemical mechanisms of Bdellovibrio adhesion to prey cells, including E. coli, as part of its overall lifecycle to hunt and consume prey. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) with force measurement modes is the technique utilized to quantitatively measure the force and timescales of adhesion between Bdellovibrio and E. coli as well as a series of chemically distinct surfaces. Our study echoes previously published work [Xu, H. et al. Langmuir, 2013, 29 (9), pp 3000–3011], where AFM force measurement data are collected for live bacterial cells interacting with specifically characterized chemical surfaces under buffer solution. Interpretation of these force data will be presented, leading to a better understanding of the prey sensing mechanisms of this enigmatic bacterial predator.