Presentation Title

Study using ruthenium complexes to determine toxicity on ctDNA

Faculty Mentor

Melanie Pribisko

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

CREVELING 25

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

The lead compound, an inherently luminescent ruthenium polypyridyl complex, Rubpy-C17, responds to light of visible wavelengths by creating an electrical dipole sufficient to alter cell membrane potential. Our aim of the study is to test the efficacy of the transition metal based nanophotoswitches (NPSs) in conferring light-induced electrical activity in the retinas and the toxicity of the molecules in the ocular environment. To better understand the biological activity of Rubpy-C17, all experiments reported here included a model complex, the well-studied tris(2,2’-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) complex. Calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ctDNA) is used to study the interactions of metal complexes with DNA (binding and/or intercalation) because it is readily accessible and closely resembles mammalian DNA. In order to determine possible mechanisms for ruthenium bipyridyl toxicity, a series of ctDNA concentrations and ruthenium complex concentrations were screened to observe different activities. The series of experiments conducted were composed of UV-Vis absorbance being recorded and graphed with varying concentrations of Rubpy-C17 and the tris-Rubpy model complex. The same amount of ctDNA concentration was kept consistent for both of the ruthenium molecules. The absorbance was recorded for all 8 samples which first consisted of the ruthenium complex sets. After the ctDNA was added to each individual sample and the absorbance was recorded again. In the end, these results were graphed on the same graph and compared to observe if there are red or blue shifts between the different samples.

Summary of research results to be presented

In analyzing the UV-Vis graphs created, there was a noticeable aggregation of the ruthenium complex as the concentration increased and it could be concluded that the complex would precipitate out instead of binding with DNA. Further studies are needed to be completed.

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

Study using ruthenium complexes to determine toxicity on ctDNA

CREVELING 25

The lead compound, an inherently luminescent ruthenium polypyridyl complex, Rubpy-C17, responds to light of visible wavelengths by creating an electrical dipole sufficient to alter cell membrane potential. Our aim of the study is to test the efficacy of the transition metal based nanophotoswitches (NPSs) in conferring light-induced electrical activity in the retinas and the toxicity of the molecules in the ocular environment. To better understand the biological activity of Rubpy-C17, all experiments reported here included a model complex, the well-studied tris(2,2’-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) complex. Calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ctDNA) is used to study the interactions of metal complexes with DNA (binding and/or intercalation) because it is readily accessible and closely resembles mammalian DNA. In order to determine possible mechanisms for ruthenium bipyridyl toxicity, a series of ctDNA concentrations and ruthenium complex concentrations were screened to observe different activities. The series of experiments conducted were composed of UV-Vis absorbance being recorded and graphed with varying concentrations of Rubpy-C17 and the tris-Rubpy model complex. The same amount of ctDNA concentration was kept consistent for both of the ruthenium molecules. The absorbance was recorded for all 8 samples which first consisted of the ruthenium complex sets. After the ctDNA was added to each individual sample and the absorbance was recorded again. In the end, these results were graphed on the same graph and compared to observe if there are red or blue shifts between the different samples.