Presentation Title

Reproduction of Microbial Fuel Cells: Applications and Effectiveness

Faculty Mentor

Terry Boan, Marcos Alvarez, Jayesh Bhakta

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

CREVELING 28

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

A microbial fuel cell (MFC) is an apparatus that converts organic material into energy using microorganisms, primarily the methane-producing (methanogen) Geobacter, as catalysts that facilitate the movement of electrons to produce a substantial electrical differential. During this process, methanogens are also producing combustible gases in abundance. These microbes, supplied by waste material, attach themselves to the anode where they break down organic material, transporting electrons to the electron acceptor and sending hydrogen protons through an ion exchange membrane. The subatomic particles meet once again in the cathode compartment, where they will react with oxygen to produce water. A prototype cell was designed and assembled using common household items to produce the highest, stable voltage output possible for this system. The purpose of this research is to demonstrate the reproducibility of 0.35V under anaerobic conditions. Implications of these experiments entail scaled-up commercial and industrial applications that can advance knowledge of sustainable sources of energy. Though the expected minimum voltage output on small scales is at least 0.35V, enough to power an led light, the prototype managed to sustain around 0.25V before encountering mechanical issues.

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

Reproduction of Microbial Fuel Cells: Applications and Effectiveness

CREVELING 28

A microbial fuel cell (MFC) is an apparatus that converts organic material into energy using microorganisms, primarily the methane-producing (methanogen) Geobacter, as catalysts that facilitate the movement of electrons to produce a substantial electrical differential. During this process, methanogens are also producing combustible gases in abundance. These microbes, supplied by waste material, attach themselves to the anode where they break down organic material, transporting electrons to the electron acceptor and sending hydrogen protons through an ion exchange membrane. The subatomic particles meet once again in the cathode compartment, where they will react with oxygen to produce water. A prototype cell was designed and assembled using common household items to produce the highest, stable voltage output possible for this system. The purpose of this research is to demonstrate the reproducibility of 0.35V under anaerobic conditions. Implications of these experiments entail scaled-up commercial and industrial applications that can advance knowledge of sustainable sources of energy. Though the expected minimum voltage output on small scales is at least 0.35V, enough to power an led light, the prototype managed to sustain around 0.25V before encountering mechanical issues.