Presentation Title

Assembling and Calibrating a Capacitive Dilatometer for Magnetostriction and Thermal Expansion Measurements

Faculty Mentor

George M. Schmiedeshoff

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

CREVELING 39

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Plutonium exhibits unique behavior in its metallurgical, mechanical, and thermal properties. Much of this behavior is not fully understood. Magnetostriction and thermal expansion measurements could give important support to the disordered local moment model or the valence fluctuation model for the behavior of Plutonium's electrons. This project focused on assembling capacitive dilatometers in preparation for thermal expansion and magnetostriction measurements of Plutonium. This capacitive dilatometer design is particularly fitting for Plutonium dilation measurements because of its high resolution, 10 parts per billion, and its allowance for various sample shapes and sizes. In addition, it functions well at low temperatures and can be modified for high temperatures. Thus, it can be used for magnetostriction measurements at a wide range of temperatures to probe the temperature dependence. The assembly of these capacitive dilatometers is the beginning of a multi-year project with the goal of using this dilatometer design to observe the multiple structural phase transitions of Plutonium and to make magnetostriction measurements in a field of 0 to 15 Tesla at a wide range of temperatures.

Summary of research results to be presented

The result of this project was the assembly of three capacitive dilatometers for use in a Physical Properties Measurement System and a 15 Tesla Magnet.

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

Assembling and Calibrating a Capacitive Dilatometer for Magnetostriction and Thermal Expansion Measurements

CREVELING 39

Plutonium exhibits unique behavior in its metallurgical, mechanical, and thermal properties. Much of this behavior is not fully understood. Magnetostriction and thermal expansion measurements could give important support to the disordered local moment model or the valence fluctuation model for the behavior of Plutonium's electrons. This project focused on assembling capacitive dilatometers in preparation for thermal expansion and magnetostriction measurements of Plutonium. This capacitive dilatometer design is particularly fitting for Plutonium dilation measurements because of its high resolution, 10 parts per billion, and its allowance for various sample shapes and sizes. In addition, it functions well at low temperatures and can be modified for high temperatures. Thus, it can be used for magnetostriction measurements at a wide range of temperatures to probe the temperature dependence. The assembly of these capacitive dilatometers is the beginning of a multi-year project with the goal of using this dilatometer design to observe the multiple structural phase transitions of Plutonium and to make magnetostriction measurements in a field of 0 to 15 Tesla at a wide range of temperatures.