Presentation Title

How Stream Size Affected the MuleFat

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Rhea Presiado

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

CREVELING 51

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

The Lower Arroyo Seco watershed, stretching from the San Gabriel Mountains to downtown Los Angeles, is home too many native species of plants, and the river that flows through it is the primary source of the ecosystems life and growth. It is important for the ecosystem because it is important to butterfly and bees alike while also attracting other beneficial insects as well. Located within the San Gabriel Mountain area, the Arroyo Seco watershed is home to riparian plants, such as the Mulefat scrubs, scientifically known as Baccharis salicifolia. The mulefat scrub is a willowlike flourishing bush growing up to 12' high with branched sticky foliage red-tinged white flowers in the sage scrub community. It is characteristic by the long-toothed pointed leaves are with two lateral veins down the middle. It is common in moist stream banks and requires a fair amount of water to strive. The Arroyo Seco watershed, in the past, wanted to recreate channeled water banks to helped riparian plants, so it became a straight concrete dam was built in the 1930s. The plan was to created small braided stream types to help with the fluvial process. Thus, this created a drainage basin for Arroyo Seco to help protect river water quality. However, this setback for riparian plants since some stream prevent upper mulefat from absorbing the water quantity it needs. Therefore the mulefat shrubs are growing weaker and are not to their full form throughout the years. We hypothesize that because the river is declining due to dryer seasons, it is not able to sprout as many of the plants because the mulefat scrub is one that depends on a more watery base.

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

How Stream Size Affected the MuleFat

CREVELING 51

The Lower Arroyo Seco watershed, stretching from the San Gabriel Mountains to downtown Los Angeles, is home too many native species of plants, and the river that flows through it is the primary source of the ecosystems life and growth. It is important for the ecosystem because it is important to butterfly and bees alike while also attracting other beneficial insects as well. Located within the San Gabriel Mountain area, the Arroyo Seco watershed is home to riparian plants, such as the Mulefat scrubs, scientifically known as Baccharis salicifolia. The mulefat scrub is a willowlike flourishing bush growing up to 12' high with branched sticky foliage red-tinged white flowers in the sage scrub community. It is characteristic by the long-toothed pointed leaves are with two lateral veins down the middle. It is common in moist stream banks and requires a fair amount of water to strive. The Arroyo Seco watershed, in the past, wanted to recreate channeled water banks to helped riparian plants, so it became a straight concrete dam was built in the 1930s. The plan was to created small braided stream types to help with the fluvial process. Thus, this created a drainage basin for Arroyo Seco to help protect river water quality. However, this setback for riparian plants since some stream prevent upper mulefat from absorbing the water quantity it needs. Therefore the mulefat shrubs are growing weaker and are not to their full form throughout the years. We hypothesize that because the river is declining due to dryer seasons, it is not able to sprout as many of the plants because the mulefat scrub is one that depends on a more watery base.