Presentation Title

"working/draft"

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Rhea Presiado

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

CREVELING 52

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Our group’s research topic area will be on one of California’s treasures, the Arroyo Seco Biosphere. Specifically, our group’s main topic covers Oak Tree’s and their average age throughout Arroyo Seco. There are many other plants to choose from, but the oak tree’s potential size, attributes, and recognizable traits make it a great candidate for our research. Furthermore, our group will be researching the approximate age of every oak tree we come across on our field day research, in addition to noting where we find the tree. The Arroyo Seco, meaning "dry stream" in Spanish, is a nearly 25-mile-long canyon, seasonal river, watershed, and are containing many cultures in Los Angeles County, California. Explorer, Gaspar de Portolà, named the stream Arroyo Seco because this canyon had the least water of any he had seen. The Arroyo was created by watershed from the Red Box Saddle in the Angeles National Forest near Mount Wilson in the San Gabriel Mountains. The Arroyo Seco stream helps to replenish the Raymond Basin, an aquifer underlying Pasadena that provides about half of the local water supply.

This great Riparian environment is home to the oak trees used for our research. Our Oak tree fits in the Arroyo by being that shady place to rest and at the same time supplying very rich and nutrient soil that benefits all plant life. Trees have been cut down in the Hahamonga Watershed Park (a northern part of the arroyo) and some think it can take around 50 years to come back to full strength. This gives us an initial peek as to the age of our trees of research prior to our actual research data. We are also interested in the location of these oak trees, and if the slope or temperature affect our beloved oak trees in any way.

The information gathered here will hopefully shed light on the importance and the long standing that our oaks have in this riparian environment. By the group educating ourselves we will then pass this knowledge down so everyone can be more in tune with the environment. In the article “Width for Estimating Height in Stem Analysis. Forest Science, vol. 59, no. 6, 2013, pp. 599-609.”, it presents a general conceptual framework for seven methods of estimating the height to a given age by stem analysis, which involves estimates of periodical annual increment in height. This will directly help us with the estimation of our trees used in the research.

Our group’s main hypothesis for this project is as follows: Oak Tree’s found within the Arroyo Seco on average will be approximately 60 years of age and be mostly found and distributed in Oak Woodland zones.

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

"working/draft"

CREVELING 52

Our group’s research topic area will be on one of California’s treasures, the Arroyo Seco Biosphere. Specifically, our group’s main topic covers Oak Tree’s and their average age throughout Arroyo Seco. There are many other plants to choose from, but the oak tree’s potential size, attributes, and recognizable traits make it a great candidate for our research. Furthermore, our group will be researching the approximate age of every oak tree we come across on our field day research, in addition to noting where we find the tree. The Arroyo Seco, meaning "dry stream" in Spanish, is a nearly 25-mile-long canyon, seasonal river, watershed, and are containing many cultures in Los Angeles County, California. Explorer, Gaspar de Portolà, named the stream Arroyo Seco because this canyon had the least water of any he had seen. The Arroyo was created by watershed from the Red Box Saddle in the Angeles National Forest near Mount Wilson in the San Gabriel Mountains. The Arroyo Seco stream helps to replenish the Raymond Basin, an aquifer underlying Pasadena that provides about half of the local water supply.

This great Riparian environment is home to the oak trees used for our research. Our Oak tree fits in the Arroyo by being that shady place to rest and at the same time supplying very rich and nutrient soil that benefits all plant life. Trees have been cut down in the Hahamonga Watershed Park (a northern part of the arroyo) and some think it can take around 50 years to come back to full strength. This gives us an initial peek as to the age of our trees of research prior to our actual research data. We are also interested in the location of these oak trees, and if the slope or temperature affect our beloved oak trees in any way.

The information gathered here will hopefully shed light on the importance and the long standing that our oaks have in this riparian environment. By the group educating ourselves we will then pass this knowledge down so everyone can be more in tune with the environment. In the article “Width for Estimating Height in Stem Analysis. Forest Science, vol. 59, no. 6, 2013, pp. 599-609.”, it presents a general conceptual framework for seven methods of estimating the height to a given age by stem analysis, which involves estimates of periodical annual increment in height. This will directly help us with the estimation of our trees used in the research.

Our group’s main hypothesis for this project is as follows: Oak Tree’s found within the Arroyo Seco on average will be approximately 60 years of age and be mostly found and distributed in Oak Woodland zones.