Presentation Title

Distribution of Nicotiana Glauca at Eaton Canyon

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Rhea Presiado

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

CREVELING 55

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Introduction

Invasive species are a growing concern in local ecosystems. Their introduction can lead to the destruction of the ecosystems they colonize, which can have environmental, economic, and social consequences. (John G. Ehrenfeld, 2010) Invasive species are affected and, in some cases, managed by natural phenomena, such as naturally occurring forest fires. Eaton Canyon has not had a forest fire since 1993, which directly leads to an overgrowth of flora, allowing non-fire resilient plants to colonize the ecosystem. . (James K. Agee, 2006) This unrestricted growth of invasive species creates resource competition between them and the natives. Nicotiana Glauca, also known as tree tobacco, is part of the Solanaceae family, native to South America, and is considered invasive to native plant species in southern California. (Michael H. Nee, 2012). It is commonly found along open or clustered flats and slopes up to an elevation of 1100 ft. (Jepson Herbarium Manual, 2018). The objective is to measure the distribution of Nicotiana Glauca at Eaton Canyon Falls. Due to the nature of the small tree, an abundance of Glauca is to be found along the slopes of the stream throughout the shady areas of the entire canyon.

Methods

In our efforts to map the distribution of Nicotiana Glauca within the Eaton Canyon falls and wash, we began mapping the species height in meters, population by marker, and GPS location up to 2 meters from the edge of the stream on both sides. We recorded a marker for each individual Nicotiana Glauca plant, or if there were several close enough to make multiple markers arbitrary, a marker for each cluster, and the population of each cluster. We recorded the geographical coordinates onto the GPS as well as by hand into a journal.

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

Distribution of Nicotiana Glauca at Eaton Canyon

CREVELING 55

Introduction

Invasive species are a growing concern in local ecosystems. Their introduction can lead to the destruction of the ecosystems they colonize, which can have environmental, economic, and social consequences. (John G. Ehrenfeld, 2010) Invasive species are affected and, in some cases, managed by natural phenomena, such as naturally occurring forest fires. Eaton Canyon has not had a forest fire since 1993, which directly leads to an overgrowth of flora, allowing non-fire resilient plants to colonize the ecosystem. . (James K. Agee, 2006) This unrestricted growth of invasive species creates resource competition between them and the natives. Nicotiana Glauca, also known as tree tobacco, is part of the Solanaceae family, native to South America, and is considered invasive to native plant species in southern California. (Michael H. Nee, 2012). It is commonly found along open or clustered flats and slopes up to an elevation of 1100 ft. (Jepson Herbarium Manual, 2018). The objective is to measure the distribution of Nicotiana Glauca at Eaton Canyon Falls. Due to the nature of the small tree, an abundance of Glauca is to be found along the slopes of the stream throughout the shady areas of the entire canyon.

Methods

In our efforts to map the distribution of Nicotiana Glauca within the Eaton Canyon falls and wash, we began mapping the species height in meters, population by marker, and GPS location up to 2 meters from the edge of the stream on both sides. We recorded a marker for each individual Nicotiana Glauca plant, or if there were several close enough to make multiple markers arbitrary, a marker for each cluster, and the population of each cluster. We recorded the geographical coordinates onto the GPS as well as by hand into a journal.