Presentation Title

CHARACTERIZING HAND-MADE PLANAR INDUCTOR COMPONENTS IN THE SERIES RLC CIRCUIT

Faculty Mentor

Stephen Tsui

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

CREVELING 66

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

In the introductory physics curriculum, students are taught induction by examining the behavior of the current-carrying coil, which can be further reinforced by building solenoids in the instructional laboratory. This framework is then used to introduce inductors as components in electrical circuits that store energy in the magnetic field, which are utilized, for example, to build electronic filters. Whereas students often take home the idea that inductors are coils, that is not always the case. As electronic devices approach the nanoscale, one might ask a student how would it be possible to fit an inductor onto an electronic chip. In this work, we demonstrate the construction of macroscale planar spiral inductors using commercially available copper tape and compare their behavior to an off-the-shelf inductor.

Summary of research results to be presented

We demonstrate the use of these inductors in a series RLC circuit and observed the expected resonance behavior. The construction and testing of these inductors is a cost-effective way to introduce students to the principles behind microelectronics and electronic chip design.

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

CHARACTERIZING HAND-MADE PLANAR INDUCTOR COMPONENTS IN THE SERIES RLC CIRCUIT

CREVELING 66

In the introductory physics curriculum, students are taught induction by examining the behavior of the current-carrying coil, which can be further reinforced by building solenoids in the instructional laboratory. This framework is then used to introduce inductors as components in electrical circuits that store energy in the magnetic field, which are utilized, for example, to build electronic filters. Whereas students often take home the idea that inductors are coils, that is not always the case. As electronic devices approach the nanoscale, one might ask a student how would it be possible to fit an inductor onto an electronic chip. In this work, we demonstrate the construction of macroscale planar spiral inductors using commercially available copper tape and compare their behavior to an off-the-shelf inductor.